The Official Supernatural: “Alex Annie Alexis Ann” (9.19) Retro Recap and Review

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According to recent reports from Vancouver, the cast returned to work the first week of August (about two weeks late) . Jensen Ackles also explained in a recent virtual “fan experience” through Creation Con that the writing for the last two episodes has been tweaked to reflect recent events (i.e., the Coronavirus pandemic). With these writers, I’m not sure if that’s a good thing or a bad thing. He also said that 15.19 will be a season finale, while 15.20 is more like a series finale (and expressed sadness on Instagram when he got the final script, which said “The End” instead of the usual “To Be Continued”). In an already truncated final season, that likely means we’ll get stuck with some filler clips episode as the last one. Yay.

The show is returning October 8 and the series finale will be November 19. Yes, it’s back on Thursdays. If I manage to stay on track, I should be able to post the season nine finale retro review right after the show comes back on Sunday, then bring in the newest season five recap and review the following Thursday.

There are some new trailers out for the last episodes. Finally.

If you’re enjoying these articles and reviews, any contributions are welcome. Even in a pandemic, the kitties still gotta eat and I’ve got a house full of fosters right now. My kitty Goose is doing much better, thank you (she’s acting as if nothing happened now), but I’ve still got that bill, so every little bit helps.

Scroll down to find links to all of my recaps and reviews of all seasons up to this point.

Recap: Recap of how to kill vampires, with a Dean voiceover, and one about Jody that specifies how her zombie son ate her husband, and then she found religion and hunting monsters.

Cut to Now where a Sioux Falls cop is wrestling a young woman down the halls of Jody’s precinct. He puts her in a holding cell, but as he sits down in exhaustion, he gets a call over the radio. Despite her pleas that he not leave her there alone (and it’s against rules for him to do so), he takes the call. She looks scared.

Time passes and as it gets dark, she hears a noise outside her cell. A young man in a tan jacket appears outside. She knows him. His name is Cody. When she asks how he found her, he scoffs. Seems she ran away while the rest of the family was “off on a hunt” and he came to fetch her before she could get the two of them in trouble. When she says he can’t get to her in the cell, he shows her the keys and opens the door as she backs away.

It turns out that Cody faked the call the officer got, then attacked him when he arrived. He says “he barely saw me coming” as he shows vampire teeth. When he tells that her that “we will always find you,” he never sees Jody coming when she beheads him from behind with a fire axe. Go Jody.

Cue title cards.

Cut to a daytime exterior shot of a Sioux Falls sheriff’s car and the precinct’s parking lot as the Impala arrives in the rain. Jody is waiting for them as they get out. Smiles of greeting all around and a reference to her last case with them, when she got stabbed in the shoulder by a crazy goddess (“Only aches when it rains”).

When she asks them how they’re doing, they answer almost simultaneously.

Dean: Peachy.

Sam: Touch and go.

Jody: I know the feeling.

She quickly gets down to business. Opening her cruiser trunk, she shows them the bisected body of the “young man” (now revealed to be a vampire). Sam checks for the teeth and comfirms it.

Dean: I dunno, Sammy. Looks like Jody might not need our help, anymore.

Sam: Ah, they grow up too fast.

Dean: Don’t they?

Jody smiles at the compliment, but explains that there are a few extra wrinkles in this case and those she does need help with. She explains about the girl who was brought in during the teaser and that she overheard the conversation with Doomed Teaser Vampire, how the others he was with were coming after her, too. Also, the girl (a Jane Doe) had a one-way ticket out of O’Neill, Nebraska. And is practically feral.

The Brothers explain that the girl is probably running from a nest of vampires. Then they have to explain to Jody what a nest is. She’s a little horrified.

Inside, while the girl is handcuffed to a chair, Sam gives her a pretty rough check of her gums. She comes up human.

Recognizing what the check is for, she snarks that she doubts the Brothers are FBI and correctly guesses that they’re Hunters. After a dual brotherly double-take, Dean asks some equally uncomfortable questions about why the dead vampire was after her, who are the “others” coming and are they a nest? After suggesting that the first thing she should have done was thank Jody, he also notices a bite mark on her neck, which she tries to cover up, with an uneasy look.

Jody comes in with some new information. Outside the holding cell, they discuss it. They have an ID on the girl via DNA. Her name is Annie Jones and she was abducted from her grandmother (now deceased) near Kenosha, WI in 2006. Jody wonders if Annie was originally kidnapped by the vampires, but Dean thinks it’s more likely the vampires abducted her more recently – they don’t tend to keep human captives long. They either kill or turn them. Jody’s not so sure, pointing out that the exchange between Annie and the vampire seemed “familiar.”

Sam points out that Annie has a lot of old feeding scars on her neck. Dean says, so Sam thinks she was a blood slave for that long? Dean explains to Jody that they have seen humans kept by vampires as “pets,” fed on but not killed by the vampires. The humans become devoted to their masters (Jody calls it “Vampire Stockholm Syndrome”).

Dean: She’s protecting the nest.

The Brothers go in to talk to Annie (who insists her name is Alex) and try to break her conditioning, with Jody watching. Sam plays Good Cop, Dean Bad Cop. Annie says that she ran away because “it was time” to go off on her own. The Brothers note that’s not how this works. When Sam says the nest has her scent and points out that the vampires fed on her, Annie/Alex insists that feeding her “brothers” was her choice. They brought her food, so when they were unsuccessful in finding humans to feed on, she gave them her blood.

She tries to flash out in anger at Jody for killing Cody, but Dean coldly brings her back down off her high horse by saying that her choices brought her and Cody to this station, and got Cody killed. He asks her where the nest is, but she says that she can’t. She says that “Mama” will kill her now if she finds her. This upsets her.

Outside, Jody seems to be getting emotionally involved and Dean asks if she’s okay (she insists she is). She muses that it’s no wonder the girl didn’t thank her, since to her, the vampire was her brother, not a monster. She also wonders why they bothered to change her name to something so similar.

Sam does some research on O’Neill and comes up with an abandoned fire station and a few homes that might serve as a vampire nest. He and Dean can go check out it out quickly and easily. They ask Jody if she’s okay babysitting “Alex” and suggest she take her away from the station. Vampires, being natural trackers, already know the location in looking for her. Jody says she has “an old family cabin” in the woods near town. She can take Alex there. But she refuses Dean’s suggestion of backup. It turns out the officer from the teaser isn’t dead, but still has no idea what attacked him. Jody doesn’t want to have to give The Talk to half her police force, so she doesn’t bring the officer into the loop.

The Brothers tell her about the uses of dead man’s blood. Though she allows that would be a good thing to have, she feels sure (not sounding too sure) that the Brothers will have cleared out the nest and be back before any of that is necessary. Dean, holding a styrofoam cup of coffee, gives her a half-salute. The Brothers walk off to “Dean’s Dirty Organ” (been a while since they used that) and Jody’s bravado slipping after they leave.

Cut to the back bumper of an old pickup with Nebraska plates while nearby, a woman in a bus station uniform is closing up the station. She’s on her phone to someone who objected to her pulling a double shift. She points out her co-worker never showed up, so she had no choice.

As she walks to her car, a very redneck-y kind of dude walks up behind her. He fake-apologizes for startling her as she turns around, then asks her if she’s seen Alex. Identifying him as Connor and Alex as his sister, the bus station worker says that she hasn’t. As two more rednecks come up behind him, he reveals that he’s just toying with her. He knows she sold Alex the bus ticket she got out of O’Neill.

The woman not-quite confesses to it, while calling the family “weird.” But she gets scared when Connor tells her the co-worker who left her in the lurch told them she sold Alex the ticket. And he didn’t show up for work because they killed him afterward. That’s when she starts running. But a red-headed older woman pops up and laughs at the bus worker calling her family weird: “Oh, honey, you have no idea.” The bus worker screams as the older woman shows fangs.

Y’know, I’ve always really felt bad for this particular redshirt. All she did was help a girl out of what she (accurately) felt was a bad and abusive situation. And not only did she end up dead, but nobody even noticed. That’s harsh.

Also that night, Jody is pulling up in her cop car to the cabin with Alex. Jody smiles at Alex’s silence, saying the place is “nicer” on the inside. She has great memories of going there with her parents and then her – her smile fades as she remembers her husband and son. Alex notices the omission.

On the way in, Jody points out that they’re in the middle of the woods. Alex says she knows what that means – it’s pointless to run. She’s heard that one before, I guess.

Inside, as Jody is pulling groceries out of bags, Alex is putting up a front. She picks a crucifix off the wall and notes that it doesn’t actually work on vampires (Jody says that’s not why she has one). Then she starts picking through the family photos Jody has on the mantle. She asks about Jody’s family in a dismissive way, even when Jody says that they are dead. Jody points out that Alex could have asked a lot more politely.

Alex: How did they die?

Jody: Horribly.

Jody offers to make up a bed for Alex, knowing full well she didn’t sleep at the station the night before. Alex refuses and sits on the couch. Jody shrugs and goes back to unpacking groceries.

In O’Neill, the Brothers are entering a house at night, with flashlights (perhaps not the best time to hunt vampires, but okay). They find bedding, even though the house has been foreclosed on. Dean figures the vampires are squatting. Sam notices windows painted black. When they hear a noise, they go to investigate.

Out back, a redneck vampire is shoving a woman’s body into a wood chipper. Dean comes out, holding a machete, asking if the guy needs a hand (“Oh! I see you already have one!”). When the vamp shows teeth, Sam comes up behind him and smacks him over the head with the shovel. Not the sharpest fangs in the rack, these vampires.

The Brothers chain him up inside the house and interrogate him, mocking him for botching even a low-level job like hiding bodies. They’ve also found the IDs for the two dead bus station employees and ask why the nest targeted them. The vampire claims it was just “hunger.”

His eyes looking black, Dean strolls over to the vamp, grabs him by the hair, and reiterates his question. The vampire, being stupid, just laughs. Goodbye Stupid Redneck Vamp. It was real.

At the Sioux Falls station, it’s night-time as well. Poor Frank (Doomed Teaser Cop) is on duty when in comes the nest. And they can apparently smell Alex all over him.

Back in O’Neill, Dean finally gets the vampire to talk by obliquely mentioning Alex as a victim of the nest. The vamp calls her “Alexis” and boy, does he have some brewing resentment toward her. Sibling rivalry, amirite?

Sam gets a few questions in there, too, when the vampire mentions “Mama,” correctly guessing that she was the original vampire who turned the rest (Super-Wiki says her name is “Celia,” but there’s no dialogue to that effect in the episode). Their prisoner’s resentment of Alex stems from Mama’s refusal to turn Alex like the others. Mama was too sentimental about her, even though he warned her Alex would get them into trouble, even though Alex acted out. It seems Alex was getting increasingly upset about the way the vampires fed on humans.

Stupid Redneck Vampire: Like she’s better than us.

Dean: She is better than you, dumbass!

The vampire claims that Alex’s “teenage identity crisis” is just an act. He brags about how the nest stayed off Hunter radar for years (um, well, that’s because there are a lot of monsters out there). The nest used Alex as a lure to pull in victims, mostly predatory male drifters “no one would miss,” by having her pose as an innocent teenage runaway in seedy honkytonk bars.

We get a flashback to Alex in one such bar, being propositioned by a sleazy, middle-aged bearded dude. She smiles and then brings him back to her place. He asks her what her name is. She says it’s “Ann.”

Then, as the Brothers’ prisoner explains in voiceover that while hunts are fun, it’s much easier and safer to get “delivery,” the vampires attack the guy in the flashback after he asks her if she knows what he’s about to do to her (and she turns her back, replying “I know. Nothing”). As the guy is messily killed, Alex’s face is a mask covering some real conflict.

But in the present day, as Dean guesses that Alex was their “lure,” Alex’s “brother” is happy to paint a picture of her as a cold-blooded member of the pack. Sam realizes out loud that Jody is in danger.

Cut to Jody coming into the cabin with firewood. She can’t find Alex at first (and ignores her cell phone ringing on top of some packaged meat). But she eventually finds her asleep on a bed. She turns on the light and walks around the room, but Alex doesn’t wake. However, when she goes to put a blanket on the girl, Alex wakes up with a gasp, startling them both. Jody reassures her and then tells her she made her a sandwich out in the kitchen.

As she starts to leave, Alex asks about her grandmother. Jody gently tells her the bad news. Alex pretends that it doesn’t bother her, but as she lies back down, it’s clear she’s upset. Jody quietly closes the door as she goes out into the hallway (that hallway is mighty dark, gotta say).

Back in Nebraska, Dean can’t get hold of Jody and Sam is getting off the phone with the local police department. They’ve ID’d both bus station workers. The Brothers figure the vampires got the info about where Alex went from their victims.

Jody calls Dean and Dean warns her about what they’ve learned. Well, most of it. As he’s trying to warn her about Alex, Jody spots a truck pulling up outside and says the vampires are already there. She hangs up even as Dean says he and Sam are coming.

Dean tells Sam what’s going on and says he’ll meet him outside. Dean then goes back into the room where they have the vamp brother chained up and, with a snarl, beheads him.

At the cabin, Jody is grabbing a machete out of her duffle bag, but as she’s calling to Alex to warn her, Connor smashes through the window. Shoving a heavy dresser across the door, he grabs Alex, who screams and struggles. She’s dragged back through the window and out into the truck. Jody sees enough through the half-opened bedroom door to go running back outside through the front door. But she’s knocked down by a vamp brother who starts to rip her throat out. The others yell at him to hurry, so he stops and punches her unconcious instead. They all bail.

When Jody wakes up, it’s daylight and the Impala is rolling in. As they help her up, she tells them the vampires have Alex. Sam and Dean figure the vampires will go back to their Nebraskan nest – where they will find their brother headless. The Brothers decide to drive back there right away. Jody is determined to go with them. Even though she is hurt, she is determined to rescue Alex.

Dean warns her that Alex is a lure who has been “feeding” humans to the vampires: “She’s got more blood on her hands than most of the monsters we kill” and she’s been doing it for eight years, since she was a child. Sam agrees. He says that Alex is, at the very best, morally compromised. They can’t trust her not to turn on them for the nest.

Jody is horrified, asking if Alex “is on your list.” Sam hedges, but Dean just says, “Not yet.” Dean points out that “this is a clean-up mission, not a rescue.” The Brothers say that there are some hard moral truths one encounters in hunting and this is one of the more difficult ones. Sometimes, humans are the real monsters.

Sam wonders why Jody is so emotionally invested in a girl she barely knows. With an eye roll (as if they should be able to read her mind on her reasons), Jody strides off to the car, saying she’s coming with them. She also warns them that if they try to hurt Alex, they’ll have to go through her first.

Alex wakes up on a bed in a cellar, having been cold-cocked by Connor. Nearby, Mama is wondering if Connor said Alex struggled just as an excuse to knock her out. She mentions finding the vampire brother Dean killed (he gets a name now – Dale) and says that Alex has made quite a mess. Now they will have to move again. But even so, she’s indulgent of Alex and tells her that everything is right again now that Alex is back, even as Alex is trying to apologize.

Alex is surprised that Mama isn’t angry with her and doesn’t want to hurt her. Mama says she would never do that. Alex is her “sweet girl.” Mama, despite being a cold-blooded monster who doesn’t really understand why Alex would be afraid of her, or would run away because she had issues with the way the vampires murdered and ate humans like her, has real affection for Alex, a true mother-daughter bond. There is something deep going on here that is keeping Alex loyal and it’s not even all that twisted. Maybe there’s hope for this kid, yet.

Alex says she can’t be a lure, anymore. She feels too much guilt. She says she’d rather die.

Mama admits that it’s all her fault (truer words). She should have turned Alex years ago, but was too sentimental and couldn’t bring herself to do it (wait, what?). She figures if she turns Alex now, Alex will feel better about the vampire life and not want to leave. Okay. Um … okay.

In daylight, next to a frozen field and an abandoned tractor trailer and bus, the Brothers and Jody load up the Impala. Jody has done recon and seen the truck in the driveway of a nearby abandoned house. They’ll have to go in with a frontal assault. It’s a tough hunt, but as Sam says, they’ve faced much worse odds.

Dean reminds Jody that they are on a raid and will be cleaning out the nest. Alex has to be a secondary priority. Jody reluctantly agrees.

Inside the house, Mama is talking about how she was “selfish” not to turn Alex sooner. She wanted to watch her grow up. The feelings Alex is having are human ones. But if she turns Alex, all those feelings, all that pain, will go away. Alex is greatly tempted. We see her close her eyes and lean into her “mother”’s caress.

Outside, Jody and the Brothers are sneaking up through blinding snow to the back porch, carrying machetes. It’s a two-story wooden farmhouse, looks maybe a century old or so. They sneak in the back door, Dean first, then Jody, then Sam taking up the rear. Clearly, the Brothers are trying to protect Jody by putting her in the middle.

They don’t find anything downstairs, which is puzzling. Sam motions Jody to stay there, while they go upstairs. Using hand signals, the Brothers split up. Jody walks down the hallway and hears Alex moaning. Unfortunately, when she goes to the base of the stairs, the Brothers are outside contact. So, she goes downstairs alone.

Upstairs, Dean is finding nothing until he comes out on the landing (after hearing a loud noise out there) and finds Sam with Connor sticking a shotgun in his back. Connor orders Dean to drop his blade, which Dean, with a rather disgusted look at Sam, does. When Dean turns around, the other remaining vampire brother comes up behind him and cold-cocks him with a stick of wood.

Jody tries to sneak downstairs, but it doesn’t go very well for her, either. She finds Alex squirming on a bed. Her mouth is covered with vampire blood and her eyes are bloodshot. When Jody asks her what they did to her, she says she had no choice. At that moment, Mama comes up behind Jody and punches her out, saying “She chose me.”

Upstairs, Dean is unconscious on the floor, while Sam is duct-taped to a chair. Pointing his shotgun at Sam a lot (because Sam is trying to pull out of his bonds), Connor proceeds to monologue about how nasty it was to return home to a dead vampire brother. After ramming his gun into Sam’s stomach, he mentions knowing the two brothers are the Winchesters (surely, after having lost two vampire “brothers,” that should have been the entire nest’s signal to run like hell). Now he wants to know which of the Brothers killed Dale, while his idiot remaining brother giggles inanely.

Sam, to his credit, won’t rat out Dean. Not that it would save him, anyway. He’s definitely dinner at this point unless he gets loose or Dean wakes up.

Tossing the shotgun to the idiot (who holds it on Dean, but apparently hasn’t tied him up), Connor gets a bucket, saying they’re going to have to abandon this house. But first, they’re going to drain Sam of his blood as lunch for the road.

Downstairs, Mama is going through Jody’s things (including dead man’s blood and a kukri machete), while Jody is tied to the ceiling by her hands. She comments that Jody certainly came prepared. When Jody tries to whisper to Alex, Mama warns her not to bother her “girl.” Alex is “going through a process.”

Jody demands to know what Mama did to Alex. Mama says she fed Alex her own vampire blood. All it takes to complete this process is for Alex to feed. Going to Alex, Mama picks her up by the arm and leads her over to Jody. Alex can hear Jody’s heart beating, but pleads with Mama not to make her feed. She begs Mama to let Jody go and backs away toward the bed.

Mama notices that Jody has “made an impression on my girl.” While assuring Alex that once she is no longer human, Jody won’t matter to her, she figures that Jody is trying to fill some emotional hole in her life, that Jody is missing family. Jody thinks “that’s pretty rich” from a monster who stole Alex in the first place.

Mama grabs her by the throat (I guess she hit a nerve) and informs her that family is not just about blood. She has raised Alex as her own for nearly nine years. Jody tells her she knows what family love is about and it’s not turning Alex into a thing like her “the moment she becomes inconvenient.”

Angry, Mama shoves Jody and goes back to Alex. Slinging an arm around Alex’s shoulder, she tells her that “this Hunter Cop Bitch” is trying to get between them to save her own life and Alex shouldn’t believe anything she says. Casually, she goes and kicks Jody in the knee, breaking something, and says, “She ain’t your mother.”

Upstairs, Sam is losing blood into Mason jars pretty fast and losing consciousness. After tasting some of the blood, Connor tells his idiot brother to start draining Dean. Idiot Brother kicks Dean in the back (Dean grunts and one hand goes toward his chest, but his eyes stay closed), then gets a bucket. As he leans down to cut Dean, though, and grabs his hair, Dean’s eyes open (and they look black).

This happens very fast. Dean reaches up with the hand that slipped into his jacket and stabs Idiot Brother with a syringe of dead man’s blood. Connor, seeing what happened, comes after Dean as Dean gets up. Connor knocks him over a table.

Downstairs, Mama is getting ready to kill Jody, when Jody figures out (out loud) why she changed Annie’s name to Alex. At first, she thought it was shame, but vampires don’t have any. Her theory is that Mama once had a daughter named Alex. She admits that yes, she has a hole inside she’s been trying to fill by helping Alex. But so does Mama.

Uncertainly, Alex looks up at Mama and calls her name, and Mama can see her hold slipping on her “girl” as Jody says, “Guess it takes one to know one.”

Mama [looking straight at Alex]: That Alex? She died. A long time ago.

Jody: And it still hurts. You still feel it: the loss, the pain, like a stone in your gut. But it hurts just a little bit less whenever she’s near.

Mama turns around and says, “You bitch.” She starts beating on Jody’s face. Alex twitches when she does.

Upstairs, Connor picks up Dean’s dropped machete and goes after Dean with it. He gets Dean pinned against a wall as Dean tries to push the machete away from his throat. But then a funny thing happens – Dean has an epiphany that he has more strength than he thought. He’s able to push back on the machete (with a beast-like growl), kick Connor in the jewels, and flip their positions. Simply overpowering the vampire (which, as a human, he ought not to be able to do), he turns the blade and aims it at his enemy’s throat, then pauses to savor the moment.

Dean: Look at me! Look at me, BITCH!

The vampire, who has been trying to look away, finally rolls his eyes back down to look Dean in the eye. With another bestial Mark-ish growl, Dean shoves the machete crossways into the brick wall, straight through Connor’s neck. As the headless vampire drops and Dean’s face is covered with blood, the echoing haunting horn of the First Blade theme takes over the soundtrack.

Nearby, though half-conscious, Sam is clearly terrified … of his brother.

After a moment of savoring the kill a little too much, Dean remembers that Sam is bleeding and goes to help him, walking right past the incapacitated other brother, still twitching on the floor. Sam says Dean’s name and Dean says dismissively, “Yeah, I know: You wouldn’t have done the same for me.”

But Sam means that Jody is downstairs and likely in trouble.

And boy, is she ever. She’s got a face like hamburger and a seriously swollen eye. Mama has finally tired of beating on her, though. Releasing the chain holding Jody up (Jody falls to the floor with a groan), she tells Jody (“Lady Cop”) that whomever she lost, she will “see real soon.” She picks Jody up by the throat and starts to show her teeth, but just at that moment, she’s attacked from behind. By a shaking, jonesing Alex with a syringe of dead man’s blood.

Shocked, Mama turns around, already staggering from the effects (the veins on her face mirroring the blood on Jody’s), to see a woeful Alex still holding the syringe.

Mama: Alex. How could you? You were my girl!

Alex: I’m sorry, Mama.

Jody, meanwhile, has not been wasting time. Stumbling over to the table where Mama laid out her Hunter’s gear, she grabs the kukri and then Mama’s hair. Right before she swings, she tells Alex, “Don’t watch this, sweetheart.”

As a devastated Alex turns away from Mama’s accusing stare (just as she turned away from the men she lured into her nest), Jody beheads the nest’s matriarch just as Dean is leading Sam down the stairs. Dean looks shocked, Sam still pale and ropey. The scene ends on Alex’s grieving, conflicted face.

Afterward, Sam starts to compliment Dean, then admits he heard the “Look at me, bitch” line and thinks Dean enjoyed the kill a bit too much. Really, Sam? You address that, but ignore the part where your brother made it clear he still figured you didn’t give a damn about him? Way not to mend those bridges.

Anyhoo, Dean is dismissive of Sam’s concerns and reminds him that enjoying the job has never been a problem before. He’s not wrong, either, even if there most definitely something scary going on with him.

Jody comes limping out (how she can still walk after nearly a decade of the show doing her knees in is beyond me). First Sam and then Dean apologize to her for being “wrong about the girl.” Jody admits that they were, at least, correct about her being too emotionally involved and apologizes for that. She had buried her feelings about her dead family for years and this hunt brought them all back. That left her judgement “clouded.”

If you think about it, these are the only two humans in the world she can talk to about that. She certainly can’t tell poor Frank (whom the vampires beat up severely to get info about the cabin, but did leave alive). She talks about all the things she did to hide the pain and grief, such as work and religion and even “dating” (referencing her scary date with Crowley near the end of season eight).

She ends up thanking them, both for saving Alex and for curing her. The Brothers point out that she was the one who killed Alex’s sire and got the blood necessary for the cure. Dean ruefully notes (“from personal experience”) that the next few days are going to be “rough.” He asks if Jody wants them to stay, but she says she’s got this. Sam then asks her a tough question – after she’s cured, what happens to Alex?

Back inside the house, Jody goes to Alex’s room. Alex is having hot and cold flashes, and looks rough. She also refuses food, saying she’d only puke, but then thanks Jody, anyway, for the offer.

Alex admits that she agreed to get vamped because she didn’t want to disappoint Mama again. She also admits to being a lure. She starts to go into detail, but Jody (sitting down beside her) gently tells her that she already knows. Explanation is not necessary. She says that whatever Alex needs from her, she’s willing to give. Alex just lost everything, her entire family, her entire life, and “no one can understand that.”

Alex: You can.

Credits

Ratings rose again to 0.9/3 in the A18-49 demo and shot back up in audience to 2.10 million.

Review: Remember when Robert Berens could write a decent script? I know it’s been a while, but this episode is one of his earlier ones (his third) and definitely one of his good ones. The casting of the female characters helps a lot, but they wouldn’t have been able to do as much without so much to chew on.

This is how you write a feminist episode that works in a show with two male leads and doesn’t piss off the audience.

The main idea for “Alex Annie Alexis Ann” at first (this show being a horror western, after all) seems based on how Native Americans and Europeans used to kidnap each other’s children and raise them in their own culture, with mixed success. But it soon morphs more into a Face on the Milk Carton scenario and eventually settles on a sort of dysfunction family cult trope.

There are three major female guest characters (Jody, Alex and Mama) and one minor female guest character (the bus station clerk). There’s a third offscreen dead female character, Alex’s grandmother, who plays a pivotal role in the plot, via her absence. Alex is a teenage girl who has been kidnapped and raised by a family of monsters without having been turned (so she’s still human).

She starts out as that most unfortunate of TV cliches – the rebellious teenage runaway. But we begin to see more layers as the episode progresses, helped considerably by a sure-footed performance from Katherine Ramdeen and her excellent chemistry with the other female guest stars. Alex is a lost child, yes, and a lure, and a member of a monster family. But she is also a human being with human feelings, and the ability to feel human compassion and empathy. Her complex motivations are an integral part of the plot. Figuring out who she really is and what she truly stands for is a journey all of the characters end up taking, not just her.

Three mother figures (Jody, Mama and the bus station clerk) jockey for position in replacing Alex’s dead grandmother as a mother figure in her life. Mama (played by Ashley Crow with considerable gravitas and charisma) has the initial advantage. For one thing, she is a powerful, cunning and very old monster (the clothes on the male vampires, though redneck modern, imply something as far back as the Civil War, though Mama’s jewelry suggests the 1960s) with a nest of loyal vampires to back her up.

For another, she’s the one who stole Alex (when she was Annie), and has raised her with genuine love and affection. This kept Alex’s human side alive, which Mama obliquely acknowledges when she says she gave in to the temptation to keep Alex human so she could grow up. So, they have a strong mother-daughter bond that is only threatened by the fact that Alex can no longer deny her human nature or remain loyal to monsters who eat humans like her.

Due to the monster factor, the bus station clerk, unfortunately, has no chance (and I really was rooting for her to somehow escape her red shirt status, too). While she has no clue who and what she’s actually up against, she’s more than willing to sell or give Alex a bus ticket to get the hell out of Dodge away from her creepy “family.” The next and last we see of her, she’s just a hand sticking out of a wood chipper. Supernatural sure is a bleak universe when a Good Samaritan gets repaid for her kindness with such a cruel offscreen death.

Jody, though, has a good shot. Not only is she trained as a police officer, but she knows about the supernatural world. Most importantly perhaps, she has the Brothers Winchester on her speed dial. We already know about the central trauma that introduced her to that supernatural world and wrecked her family – that her son, who had recently died, was resurrected, turned zombie, and killed and ate his father (her husband) in season five’s “Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid.”

When Jody talks with the Brothers about all the many ways she tried to resolve or just bury this trauma, and even references accidentally dating Crowley last season, there’s a shared history on there that has been shown in different ways over the past four years. This is not some Hunter pal invented out of thin air who just pops up one episode. This is a character with a conflict in which the Brothers and the audience have a vested interest in helping her resolve it.

Jody even acknowledges this at the end of the episode. When Sam and Dean apologize for doubting her faith in Alex, Jody admits that her “faith” was an obsession with her own grief and easing it. She effectively apologizes for putting the whole team in danger, even as all three of them agree that the end result they managed to get was the best one.

One of the things I really like about this scene, and what leads up to it, is that even though there is a strong dichotomy between how the women handle things and how the men handle things in this episode, at no time does either brother suggest that Jody is doing what she’s doing because she’s a woman. The brothers act as though Jody’s grief is completely understandable and legitimate, and just her cross to bear. They have crosses of their own.

And Jody’s conflict lines up roughly with Alex’s own identity crisis. Just as Jody says that she and Mama have a hole in their hearts that Alex can at least partially fill and heal, Alex also has a hole that needs repair. She explicitly asks Jody at one point if her grandmother is still alive and looks disappointed (despite putting on a tough facade) when the answer is no. This is major foreshadowing for her decision to side with humans she barely knows later in the episode against her vampire “family.”

Granted, she wouldn’t have survived any other choice. Even if the show didn’t consider vampires part of the undead, none of this nest was likely to come out of this episode intact. Jody might have died, Sam, too. But Dean (yeah, I know, spoiler alert for next season) would, at worst, have come back with black eyes and taken them all out before going on his merry way. And that would have included a vamped Alex. As it is, he killed three of the four vampire brothers.

Part of what changes Alex’s mind, I think, is how the rest of her family treats her. The vampire “brothers” express barely contained resentment toward her for the fact that Mama won’t turn her and what that says about Mama’s preference for her. Even though she acts as a lure and allows them to feed on her when they are starving, they appear to have little respect for her and treat her with condescension, even contempt. One gets the impression that if Mama lost her head down the road, Alex’s “brothers” would waste little time devouring her.

But the other part seems more critical to her, even if it might seem small on the surface. Who calls Alex what says a lot about their relationship with her. Her original name was Annie. Mama calls her Alex, after a daughter who died “a long, long time ago.” Her brothers call her “Alexis.” She calls herself “Ann” when acting as a lure.

It’s Jody’s figuring out why Mama changed Annie’s name to Alex, and stating it out loud, that makes Alex realize that Jody cares about her over and above using her as a way to fill her own emptiness. Jody cares.

This is the engine that I think made the Wayward Sisters spinoff idea a strong one and that could still make it strong with some tweaking (please, you can keep Kaia, but get rid of that silly Dark Place subplot). A huge mistake the CW made was in trying to make a new show with literal Sam and Dean analogues, with vaguely Sam and Deanish conflicts, while completely missing what made the show itself unique.

The Wayward Sisters central conflict (two older Hunters filling their emptiness by taking in and raising kids orphaned by the supernatural world) fits easily within the Supernatural mythos without attempting to replace Sam and Dean. You shouldn’t be doing that in the first place. Sam and Dean are Sam and Dean. Let them keep their own story. Don’t diminish it by doing carbon copies. A spinoff should be a different story, but one that works in that universe.

The thing is that Sam and Dean are not privileged in human society. They were born into a working class family. They grew up poor and transient, in a broken household. They are drifters, grifters, serial killers, practitioners of black magic. Their world is one of working class struggle, of grinding poverty, of a hand-to-mouth existence. Just look at the site for the final battle in this episode (an abandoned farmhouse in the dead of winter) and what level of society all the characters in the episode move through.

In order for a spinoff to capture the same loyal audience the mothership has, it has to be a premise within the same worldview of desperate, cosmos-changing conflict brewing on the backroads of America, far from the usual and visible corridors of power. If you look at the episodes that hit with the audience, they fall into that premise – one big road trip through rural America with hardscrabble, down-and-out characters. If you look at the ones that don’t, they don’t.

So, you could create a spinoff pretty easily as long as it put those kinds of characters into that kind of world. In this case, you’ve got Jody, a female sheriff in a man’s profession with a tragic background in the supernatural, facing off with a group of murderous drifter monsters and choosing to assuage her pain by taking in orphans created by monster attacks. That fits. That the network chose not to pick it up, and instead went with a sexist show about pretty, cliched, rich monsters at a boarding school, tells you something about the network’s actual (lack of) commitment to a more diverse approach to American TV storytelling.

But the other thing that works with this episode is how it comments on Sam and Dean’s story, as well. This includes the mytharc. This is not just an MOTW starring Jody Mills and a random guest girl. It ties in directly with what is going on with Dean and how Sam, especially, is reacting to it.

Dean is pretty aggressive throughout the hunt and this even helps save the day. He argues that Alex cannot be trusted and may need to be killed as if she were a supernaturally flavored monster. While it’s a surprise that Sam so casually backs him up, that’s only because Sam has been second-guessing Dean since the Pilot even on cases where a monster was clearly dangerous.

But from a rational viewpoint, Sam should be backing Dean up on this. Both brothers have long and bitter experience with monsters who masquerade as innocents. The Brothers were likely thinking in this episode about Emily, a young girl they met in season seven’s “There Will Be Blood.” Emily had been kidnapped as a child by (or for) the Alpha Vampire, who used her as a pure source of blood when the Leviathans contaminated humans in ways that killed other monsters. The Brothers had given Emily Jody’s number to call for sanctuary, but Emily (still very childlike) burned it and went back to the Alpha Vampire. Like a child groomed by a pedophile, she had been brainwashed by the Alpha Vampire and saw him as her daddy.

They may even have been thinking of the two cute little monster boys who reminded them of themselves in season six’s “Mommy Dearest.” But of course, Jody was thinking of her zombie son, whom she lost twice, the second time after he ate his father and Sam shot him. This is probably why the Brothers were so relieved to be wrong – and why Jody was so rueful about admitting that no, they really weren’t.

How Dean’s aggression saves the day, however, is not how he’s ultimately wrong about Alex. That one is on Alex surprising everyone with her choosing to be human, even after she “agrees” to become a vampire. And Dean himself is happy to give Alex the vampire he himself went through so much agony to test. No, it’s in the scene where Dean takes out two vampires at once and starts to realize the power the Mark of Cain has unlocked inside him.

Dean starts the scene with cunning, under the impression that he can’t take the vampires head on due to their superior strength and speed. While it does appear that he is knocked out on the landing (love his exasperation with Sam for getting caught), it’s not clear how long he stays unconscious. He’s definitely conscious by the time Connor’s brother kicks him in the back. It’s subtle, but if you watch carefully, you can see how his hand drops inside his coat, right where the dead man’s blood syringe is that he will use in just a moment on Connor’s brother.

Also subtle, but less clear at the time, is that his eyes appear black when they first open (and when he’s interrogating Dale). I noted that this also happened in the second mirror scene in the last episode. There was considerable debate at the time this episode first came out over whether this was just a coincidental trick of the light or foreshadowing. Now, if you watch it in slow-motion, you can see the whites of his eyes, so it is a trick of the light. But in context with the overall storyline, I’d say it also has to be intentional foreshadowing.

The moment when Dean finds out he has superstrength, far above that of vampires, is a revelation for both him and the vampires. Dean has the epiphany when he realizes he is successfully holding Connor at arm’s length. Connor is shocked when Dean starts pushing back. Dean goes from surprise to determination to vengeful enjoyment. Connor goes from arrogance to surprise to horror, as he realizes he can’t stop Dean from turning the machete around in his grip and shoving it through his throat. Their roles switch and each gets to experience what the other side is like. Let’s just say Dean enjoys it more. In fact, he enjoys it so much that he almost forgets that his brother is bleeding out nearby. But not quite.

Sam’s reaction is one more missed opportunity to get through to Dean and the episode tragically contrasts it to how Jody responds to Alex. While Jody chooses to see beyond Alex’s hard and contradictory exterior, seeks to understand her and empathize with her, Sam ignores everything else he sees in what Dean does against the vampires and focuses on the idea that Dean might have “enjoyed” it too much. Dean bluntly points out that enjoying hunting monsters that eat people (and who were in the process of trying to eat them) is “not a crime.” It’s no big deal if the prey enjoys it when they are able to turn the tables on the predators.

Thus, Sam loses a chance to talk to Dean about the Mark and its increasing effect on him, and Dean learns that Sam is going to be judgmental about it, anyway. It’s almost as if the way Sam remembers the first few seasons is that Dean was always judgmental about Sam’s growing powers and Sam doesn’t remember the times Dean went to bat for him and protected him against others, including John, or forgave him for some pretty hard-to-forgive stuff. Could Sam’s selective amnesia really be that strong? Is it really that hard to follow his brother’s example?

Another factor is what makes the comparison to Jody and Alex so strong. There’s a major dichotomy between how the women in this episode interact, and the competitive and – dare I say it – bitchy way the men treat each other. Also, the way Sam (and others) reacts to Dean’s changes is in line with the way women with superpowers are often treated by loved ones in such fictional settings. In fact, we see this attitude aimed at Amara in season 11.

It’s not just that the men in a superpowered woman’s life are cynical and alarmed about her ability to wield these powers. They want them for themselves. For example, look at all the characters losing their tiny little minds over Daenerys having dragons in Game of Thrones and doing the same things with them that everyone else does without dragons – like sacking cities whenever bad people murder her friends. But if you’re cold-bloodedly manipulating men to do your bidding and getting them to do things like feed your husband to his dogs (like Sansa), that’s okay.

This is also an attitude demonstrated toward men who are deemed too young and/or too low-class to “deserve” such power (thus feminizing them as inferior). Kay does it to Arthur initially in the modern Arthurian classic novel, The Once and Future King, after Arthur first pulls Excalibur out of the stone (and remember that Dean has actually done that, albeit with the clever use of explosives). Kay recognizes the sword and tries to claim it as his own, but his father shames him into admitting the truth.

We also see the noble bad guy try to do this to William, the peasant protagonist in A Knight’s Tale (2001), to avoid meeting (and losing to) him in a tournament. The Black Prince cancels this out by pulling rank (he’s the son of the aged King Edward III and Regent of England for him at that time) and knighting William. Also, it’s his tournament.

This is the pattern you see in Sam and Castiel’s attitude toward Dean having the Mark of Cain. The fact that this trope is used may even explain why shipping Dean with Sam and Castiel is so popular – this is a trope we usually see in a female character. Therefore, the subtext almost codes Dean as female, even though he’s masculine in other ways (such as masking his emotional pain with violence and alcohol (https://www.bbc.com/news/stories-54088546)).

Sam and Castiel are both concerned about the changes in Dean (and yes, these changes have a very dark side to them, so that concern is justified), but there’s also an underlying jealousy and competitiveness to them. Like the vampire “brothers” in this episode, camaraderie and competitiveness mix explosively in the male members of Team Free Will.

Both Sam and Castiel later have brushes with taking on the Mark where they jump in head-first. They override Dean’s warnings and objections from personal experience as if they hadn’t even heard them. These two keep warning that Dean can’t handle the power of the Mark, even as they’re both positively drooling over the idea of having it themselves.

On the one hand, their experiences in the temptation of power with a dark side would, you’d think, make them experts. On the other hand, these two chuckleheads are poster children for People You Don’t Give Power To Because They’ll Just Abuse it. So, maybe they shouldn’t be giving advice about power after all, let alone getting all judge-y about Dean having some.

Next week: Bloodlines: The Brothers travel to Chicago to help a young man in a hunt against four monster families in the backdoor pilot that pretty much the entire audience hated. And I have to review it. [sigh] I’m breaking out the good whiskey for this one.

The Kripke Years

Season 1

Season 2

Season 3

Season 4

Season 5

The Gamble Years

Season 6 (with Kripke)

Season 7

The Carver Years

Season 8

Season 9

Season 10

Season 11

The Dabb Years

Season 12

Season 13

Season 14

Season 15


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9 thoughts on “The Official Supernatural: “Alex Annie Alexis Ann” (9.19) Retro Recap and Review”

  1. I also liked this episode; the young actress who played Alex was my favorite of the Wayward Sisters. Well, I like Claire TOO but she was on the show before the build-up to WS, a long-time supporting character, you know what I mean?
    It ‘is’ irritating that Jody did not have more episodes and Donna as well. I liked them a LOT together and I liked them a LOT separately.

    I never saw Dean’s killing Dale in the way you described it, I did not ‘get’ that he suddenly realized he was stronger than he thought he was. NOW I see it, thanks for the link.

  2. If ever there was a character who was ripe for moral injury, it was Alex. It always made sense to me that they had her pursue nursing later, instead of hunting. Nursing helps people. And even if she totally got why others hunted, and recognized the importance of it, she probably wouldn’t have wanted to swing the blade herself. Not when she’d had an emotional connection with actual monsters.

    Now as far as Sam, I’m not sure I agree he wasn’t afraid of his family. Well, not physically maybe, though John certainly left his boys in some pretty unsafe situations. But I’ve had the impression for a long time that Sam was very much afraid of their opinions of him. Being ashamed of them, and wanting to prove he’s better than them, really just seems like an adolescent cover up for some pretty deep seated self esteem issues. Not that this would have made him any easier to live with. Sam never seemed to mature past age 20 or so.

    1. I love your thoughts on Alex, it makes so much sense to me.

      Not being able/ allowed to grow up and mature in the way children should was most certainly an issue in the Winchester family that went on to fuel the bigger issues for Sam and Dean that continues to feeds their co-dependent behaviour to this day, although they have got a little better, after a lot of learning the hard way. John held on much too tight for too long through his own fears. That problem of a fearful parent holding on too tight to a child and not facilitating growth was reflected quite strongly in this story with Mama and Alex.

      1. I’m not sure mama could have done anything but hold on too tight to Alex, since her “motherhood” was based on gross transgression against Alex’s basic autonomy. John at least, was legitimately Sam’s and Dean’s father, even if he didn’t deserve it.

        But Alex was a strong girl. I suspect she had a healthy and loving relationship with her grandmother, and it was the memory of that which allowed her to accept Jody’s love. She was able to recognize the difference.

        1. I enjoyed the interactions between Alex and Jody, they were building a great bond that felt real and organic, wish we’d had a bit more of them. There was a chemistry between the actresses that added to the story.
          Mama was certainly a bit twisted in her idea of love, but I guess we don’t know the whole back story about the daughter she lost and what lead to that.

  3. You could skip Bloodlines. Honest. We wouldnt mind. Like at all. I myself pretend that episode never happened. I watched the original airing and then once more to make sure I wasnt imagining how bad it really was…
    Once I confirmed that indeed it was I never watched it again. Life is way too short. 😉

  4. This is an interesting one. At first it appears to be standard monster of the week story with a stroppy spoiled teen. But look underneath.

    For Alex , so many people have read her as a parallel for Sam, running from his weird family and that’s not wrong, however dig deeper still and for Alex read Dean. They have so much commonality, both robbed of their childhood homes and the security that meant, both compelled to fill the void left by a dead relative, both thrown into a dangerous dark world expected to see and do things no child ever should. They ran parallel journeys up to this point, but here Alex and Dean cross over Dean heading down a dark path and Alex finding salvation through her encounter.

    Alex’s experience with her brothers somewhat mirrors Dean’s, from the moment they hit the road there was friction between the Winchester Brothers, bordering on contempt , Sam finding fault with Dean’s tape collection, looking down on his homemade EMF meter amount other things. Now some of it stems from natural sibling rivalry and Dean gives back as much as he gets, but it goes beyond on that at times. Sam sees himself as the more cultured and savvy , he feels the need at time to patronise Dean , my least favourite saying of Sam’s is “he means well” like Dean has to be excused for something when oftentimes Dean just speaks the truth and feels no need to “sugar coat it”.

    Much of this however is not entirely Sam’s fault a lot stemmed from how the Brothers were raised and this is where this episode gets interesting, for Mama read John. A man who undoubtedly loved his sons once but for his own need and ends used Dean to fill the void Mary left in so many inappropriate ways, leaning on him emotionally , shaping and choosing the life Dean would have. Dean’s inability to resist John stemming from deep love of family that was turned against him, but unlike Alex there was no one there to save Dean when he needed it .
    Sam was raised differently, to have expectations, he was shielded to a certain point, being the youngest there are things he didn’t know, but some he chose to ignore because he saw John a certain way and never fully appreciated how much Dean was father to him. That attitude continued through this episode, feeling the need to call Dean on the what, but failing to deal with the why he does what he does. Sam knows full well Dean hates monsters, period. Dean has never hidden it ( Season2 Sam?) Dean embracing what he has come to realize was always likely to happen anyway, yet Sam still had the power to avert disaster, just a little more kindness, a little more concern, but instead Sam give Dean the lecturing voice and critical eye.

    Jody was amazing , it’s a real shame her character hasn’t been utilised more, she is one of the most well written and well rounded female character who is allowed to be imperfect yet strong, in short the most realistic representation of a woman on the show to this point.
    Alex has remained a strong and positively evolving character, so much better than the flat Teens of Lawrence .I’d have liked to see more of the new Mills household dynamics.

    1. Oh, I’d forgotten all about the big comparison to Sam. While I do think that may have been the writer’s intent, it really doesn’t work for Alex. Alex is loyal to the vampires, but is increasingly afraid of them, especially Mama. At first, this appears to be a lie she’s telling Sam and Dean, but we see it’s true in the scene between her and Mama. Sam was never afraid of his family, just ashamed of them, and he took every opportunity to ditch them.

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