The Official Supernatural: “Gimme Shelter” (15.15) Recap and Review

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According to recent reports from Vancouver, the cast returned to work the first week of August (about two weeks late). Jensen Ackles also explained in a recent virtual “fan experience” through Creation Con that the writing for the last two episodes has been tweaked to reflect recent events (i.e., the Coronavirus pandemic). With these writers, I’m not sure if that’s a good thing or a bad thing. He also said that 15.19 will be a season finale, while 15.20 is more like a series finale (and expressed sadness on Instagram when he got the final script, which said “The End” instead of the usual “To Be Continued”). In an already truncated final season, that likely means we’ll get stuck with some filler clips episode as the last one. Yay.

Tonight (15.19 – “Inherit the Earth”) is the penultimate episode of the show. Showrunner Andrew Dabb has called it the “season finale” for Season 15 and next week’s the “series finale.” Reportedly, there will also be a retrospective episode first next week, so the last episode will actually air at 9pm then. This week will be the usual time slot. Feel free to comment about the episode below as you watch it.

You can find a promo, photos and a synopsis here for 15.16.

If you’re enjoying these articles and reviews, any contributions are welcome. Even in a pandemic, the kitties still gotta eat and I’ve got a house full of snarfly foster kittens with seasonal eye gunk right now. My kitty Goose is doing much better, thank you (she’s acting as if nothing happened now), but I’ve still got that bill, so every little bit helps.

Scroll down to find links to all of my recaps and reviews of all seasons up to this point.

Recap: Pretty quick recap of the Jacknatural plot this season, but framed by the EVOL Chuck storyline and an oddly Deancentric spin to Billy’s plan and the Amara mytharc from Season 11.

Cut to Now in a soup kitchen, where two young women are discussing “God’s creatures” in the form of a very shabby older woman who is homeless and lacking in manners. One girl hides it better than the other, who is a bit of a princess type and gets a nebbishy young man named Connor to go roust the woman. But he’s accosted by the pastor in charge, a bearded man who cautions him to go in with kindness rather than judgment (if the pastor looks familiar, that’s because he played Dr. Sexy in Season 5’s “Changing Channels”).

So, Connor brings over some soup and gives it to the homeless woman, as the pastor smiles at the first girl, who is apparently his daughter (and played by the girl who let the clown into the house in the teaser to Season 2’s “Everybody Loves a Clown”). After some hesitation, she returns the smile.

Later that night, Connor is walking down a shabby street brightly lit by neon, when he is lured into a darker alleyway by an echo-y man’s voice calling his name and shouting for help. This being Supernatural, and this being an episode teaser, we all know this won’t end well for Connor. It doesn’t.

As he gets nervous and backs up, Connor trips over something. It’s a teddy bear and when he picks it up, it says, “Hey, Connor.” Then he’s lassoed from behind by the kind of noose that Animal Control uses on stray dogs, and dragged off the street into the shadows after apparently being choked to death.

Cue Title Cards.

In the Bunker, Dean is entering the Library and asking if Sam has “found anything.” Sam brings up Doomed Teaser Connor and his death in the alleyway. He asks if Dean has “anything” and this turns out to be looking for Amara. And Dean has something.

Seems Atlantic City just had a blackout (“darkness,” Dean lampshades) right before a Keno tournament there. Dean points out that Chuck once said Amara was fond of Keno.

Sam: I thought he was kidding.

Dean: He’s not that funny.

Sam thinks it’s “weak,” to which I roll my eyes. Dean points out that’s all they’ve got. I’d like to point out to Sam that his brother’s instincts have been very good on this sort of thing. Maybe, after 15 seasons, start trusting them?

Castiel shows up and asks what they’ve got going. As they pack up, they tell him to stay back at the Bunker and watch over Jack. Castiel points out that they are looking for Amara, a god-level being, and they intend to “lie to her face.” Sam says it’s probably nothing and Dean says if they do find Amara, “we used to have a thing,” which is an epic understatement. Besides (it’s not said out loud), it wouldn’t hurt to have a backup team in case things go south.

In the Library, Jack has found Sam’s research on Doomed Teaser Connor and asks about the hunt. Sam says it’s probably nothing and not to worry about it, that it’s probably “not our thing.” Dean contradicts Sam and suggests Castiel take Jack out to investigate it, just in case, and to get away from any flashbacks to “Mrs. Butters.” Castiel doesn’t recognize who she is, so I guess Jack will fill him in on the trip out.

Dean[about the case]: You can Highway to Heaven the bitch.

At the scene of the crime, Castiel and an enthusiastic Jack are interviewing a friendly, junoesque cop. I kinda like her. I guess we’ll never see her again.

Cop [to Jack]: You look greener than Baby Yoda.

Oh, if Jack were only as fun and well-written as Baby Yoda.

The veteran cop is unimpressed by Jack and bemused by the pair’s weird questions about black magic. But she does provide some important clues. Connor had “Liar” carved on his body. Also, all of his fingers had been chopped off and shoved down his throat, presumably pre-mortem. She also shows them a photo of the teddy bear. Jack cheerfully exclaims that the bear is “Marvelous Marvin” and he has one. Obviously, this does not impress the cop, even when Jack backpedals and claims he got the bear for his nonexistent nephew, Ronald.

The cop says there was a speaker inside the bear and one nearby inside a fake rock. She also shows them CCTV footage from across the street of a short, masked figure furtively dragging Connor off. Jack opines that this all sounds almost “demonic.” So, later that night, they go to a crossroads outside town. Castiel digs a hole and puts in a hoodoo CRD summoning box with his photo inside, while Jack looks Connor up online. Castiel opines that the internet has “so many cat photos … too many cats.” (There can never be too many cat photos, Cas.)

The CRD takes a while to show up and when he does, he claims that “the shop’s closed” in a British voice. When Jack calls him out on it, he claims his name is Zach and that he “has style.”

Jack gets straight to the point and asks why Connor was killed. Dropping the accent for an American one, Zach admits that he doesn’t know. It’s not related to demons. In fact, no CRDs have been making deals since Rowena banned them. Seems Rowena feels people should only go to Hell if they truly deserve it. Well, I can get behind that philosophy.

On the one hand, Zach admits that the lack of quotas is rather nice. On the other, it’s introduced an existential dilemma for the CRDs – what’s their function these days? He’s desperate to tag along on the hunt, especially since it involves angels and he’s fascinated by the idea of teaming up with one, but Castiel tells him to buzz off. Too bad. Zach’s kinda fun.

As they walk back to the car, Jack sadly says this isn’t their kind of case, so they might as well go back to the Bunker and wait for Sam and Dean to return. Castiel demurs. This may not be their kind of case, but there is something going on. He wants to investigate further.

Cut to nighttime at the soup kitchen, called the “Patchwork Community Center” (because of course it is). A rather rode-hard-and-put-away wet redheaded volunteer is closing up for the night. As she goes out, she furtively steals from the donations box.

Out in the parking lot, she hears her name being shouted by the same male voice that lured Connor. Wisely, she decides to make a call, instead (presumably to 911), but as she turns around, she encounters someone in a mask, who growls her name. She screams.

Cut to Castiel and Jack, in their car, in front of the soup kitchen. Castiel is on the phone to Dean, telling him about Rowena’s new “lockdown” of Hell. Dean approves. Sam asks about Jack and Castiel says he is “focused” (which Dean calls “good”). He tells them about Valerie’s disappearance.

Sam calls that “a lead.” Dean warns them to be careful of the “Hallelujah Types,” saying that while “most of them play it straight,” others think “the Feds are from the Deep State.” He suggests a “divide and conquer” strategy of sending Jack in undercover to see what he can find, while Castiel interviews them as a “Fed.” Castiel says okay and asks how the “search for Amara” is going. Dean abruptly replies, “Dandy!” and signs off, leaving an exasperated Castiel looking at his phone.

Back in the Impala, Sam wonders if this lead is really such a hot one. Their plan, such as it is, is to get Amara on board as their ally against her own brother, while simultaneously setting her up for her own death. Dean insists that that’s the price they have to pay to make Billie’s plan work, the “catch.” Dean is acutely aware that when you play a game with Death, someone’s going to die. At least this time, he figures it’s good that it’s not him and his brother.

I’m not a big fan of this development and not just because I actually quite liked Amara and her relationship with Dean, and it seems like a pretty nasty thing to do to her. Yeah, it’s somewhat in character for Dean to be so much in denial (at least on the surface) about his (mutual) feelings for Amara that he would act as if he’s okay with this plan.

But it is completely out of character for Sam to demonstrate any qualms whatsoever about throwing her under the plot bus. Sam’s extreme antipathy toward Amara in Season 11, his massive jealousy of his brother’s relationship with her, and his unshakeable conviction that said relationship was toxic (when it turns out it wasn’t), were precisely the reasons why Dean lied to him about his feelings for her in the first place. Now, we’re suddenly supposed to believe that Sam cares about what happens to her? Since when?

As Jack walks into the soup kitchen, the minister is having a short remembrance service for Connor. Jack introduces himself to the daughter (nearly flubbing it right off by playing Dean’s previous joke about his “drinking the Kool-Aid”). She is bored and not terribly impressed when Jack says he wants to sign up for the ministry.

Castiel comes in and they both nearly blow their cover by acknowledging each other. Castiel then zeroes in on the pastor, who is finishing up a shared private prayer with a parishioner. Castiel introduces himself as a Fed, then shocks the hell out of the pastor by telling him Valerie Jones has been kidnapped. Seems the guy didn’t know (or he’s a really good liar).

Cut to poor Ms. Jones. She wakes up tied to a chair in a nondescript room. Her left hand is stuck in some kind of sinister contraption and she’s gagged. When she looks over at the wall, she sees the word “GREED” painted in huge red letters on it. She looks around the room and jumps when she sees the mask that was on the person who knocked her out (it’s now on a rack next a TV). She starts screaming “Help!” into her gag.

The TV blinks on and the word “Thief,” in different caps, streams across it, over and over. We then find out what the contraption is when a plunger over one of her fingers is depressed by remote and a blade inside the contraption hacks off one of her fingers. Predictably, Valerie shrieks and wails in pain and fear. Get sticky fingers and you lose ’em, I guess.

On the screen, the number 03:00:00 pops up and a countdown begins. A red light blinking on a camera overhead shows that she’s being watched and possibly filmed.

Cut back to the soup kitchen, where Jack is filling out the form. Princess is commenting the daughter, Sylvia, that he’s cute (oh, please, Show) and Sylvia is sort of shrugging it off, while also checking Jack out. We also find out that the church used to hand out Bibles rather than food, and both girls show Jack how to be totally fake and smiling when handing it out when he brings up the form.

But when he asks about Connor, Sylvia gets upset and goes to sit down across the room. When Jack comes over and sits down near her, he admits that “I’m not very good at this.” She says he’s doing okay and starts to open up to him (though when she appears to brush away a tear, she’s not actually crying). She says that she and Connor once dated, a long time ago, which most consisted of watching old movies together. She says that “he was always there for me.”

Jack says, “I lost someone, too – my mother,” without mentioning that he’s the one who killed her. Sylvia confesses that her mother died three years ago. She lets out that the pastor (Pastor Joe) is her father and he’s “a better preacher than he is a dad.” When Jack admits that he has several “dads,” and that he feels he’s always “letting them down,” Sylvia calls him “sweet” and says she feels the same. She tells him, “Put your trust in God, not people.” O the irony.

Inside the office (in the background of a wooden sculpture of praying hands), Pastor Joe is telling Castiel that he feels the church is being “targeted.” Though he refuses to call it a “church,” saying that people bring “baggage” with that name. He prefers “faith-based community.” An ekklesia by any other name ….

When Castiel asks about anyone who might have “gone missing” recently, the pastor admits that his congregation is very transient. There was one guy, Brother Rudy, who’s been gone for a few weeks, but that’s because he had “parted ways” with the community, due to wanting to worship elsewhere. Uh-huh.

Sylvia comes in to ask her dad something and he rather bruskly tells her he’ll come out “in a minute.” She leaves, crestfallen. The pastor then asks Castiel if he has any children. Castiel just says, “It’s complicated.”

Pastor Joe talks about his dead wife, saying that she grew up in this church. They were much more hardcore back in the day. Everything was “God’s will.” Castiel mopily replies that “God just doesn’t care.”

A little taken aback, Pastor Joe says that he meant that people need to watch out for each other. He then goes on to say that after his wife died, he sold the church building and came here to practice a kinder and gentler form of worship, for people with different faiths and backgrounds. When Castiel asks him what he means by “backgrounds,” Joe reveals that Connor was gay. Ah, well, that would be why Connor and Sylvia weren’t dating, anymore.

Cut to Sam and Dean on the road. Sam is gassing up the car in the snow at a Gasn’Sip. Dean is refusing to eat until they reach the buffet in Atlantic City (assuming Dean’s theory on Amara doesn’t pan out and she’s not there). Alas, Sam puts a crimp in that plan when he checks his phone and discovers that there’s a pileup on the way there and they’ll be delayed six hours. They decide to go with Plan B (“pork rinds!), but Amara pops up right in front of Dean in a pink pantsuit and says, “I think we can do better than that.”

Amara greets Dean by name and asks if he missed her. When she also asks where they’re going, Dean readily admits they were trying to find her. When Sam asks how she found them, she says, “I smelled Dean from two states over.” To Dean: “You have a very distinctive musk.” Dean is flattered. She also says she heard Castiel’s angelic prayer.

While she’s happy to talk to them, she wants to have lunch with them, first – at Pavel’s Deli. She likes “new earthly experiences.” She’s “hungry,” as they are, and “I have never had a Pennsylvania pierogi.” So, off they go.

Back to the boring B (A?) story. Valerie is losing another finger as the timer comes up. Before it restarts, the screen reads, “Time is running out.”

As Castiel enters the soup kitchen, Pastor Joe is giving a short prayer/sermon as the others stand around him in a circle. This ceremony is intended to introduce Jack as their newest member. Jack is asked to “give testimony.” Jack is taken aback, so Castiel does it, instead.

He talks about how he always followed The Plan, doing “some pretty terrible things” in the cause of “blind faith.” When that “all came crashing down” (far more literally than anyone there besides Jack realizes), he felt “lost.” How he found himself again and “rediscovered” his faith was by finding a new family and becoming a father. He exchanges a look and smile with Jack while saying this.

Cut to Jack working at the soup kitchen later that day. Pastor Joe comes over to apologize for “putting him on the spot.” As he crosses the room to go do something else, the TV on the other side flicks on. It shows the counter from the scene with Valerie, then Valerie herself. She shrieks as she loses another finger. The words “You won’t save her” appear on the screen.

Jack rushes to turn the TV off as everyone there looks shocked. But it’s not until he pulls out what looks like a wireless connection that the image flicks off. Finally, something happened in this storyline to move it forward. Took long enough. The pastor has no idea who would do such a thing, but Castiel thinks he knows.

Cut to Pavel’s (it looks like nighttime, but this could just be Amara’s effect on the local environment), where Amara is eating pierogis while Dean tries to talk her into helping him and Sam take down Chuck. Amara demurs.

Even when Sam points out that he saw into Chuck’s memories that she refused to help him with the God Wound, and Dean talks about the other universes being “snuffed out” (which Amara can sense), Amara says that helping to destroy her brother is not at all the same as refusing to help him. Even after Dean tells her about the plan for Jack to grow powerful enough to kill Jack, she says no. She won’t “betray” her brother.

She goes on to explain (in a rather condescending manner) that when Dean looks at her, he sees “a woman,” and when he looks at her brother, he sees “a squirrely weirdo.” But she is not a woman and Chuck is not how he seems, either. These are just personae, masks, for two cosmic entities of inconceivable power. She says that she and Chuck are “the same … twins, Creation and Destruction, Light and Dark, balance.”

When Sam says that the “former Death” said that she was the oldest, she says that Death “told you what you needed to hear.” She claims that she and Chuck “came into existence together and when we split apart, all this was created.” Shocked, Sam realizes she means the Big Bang.

Dean sees another angle in this – that the moment they separated was the moment that Chuck betrayed Amara – and aggressively presses it. Somewhat reluctantly, Amara allows that she “may be a fool,” but that she feels her brother’s betrayal “hurt him deeply” and that betraying him would be “an agony” for her.

Amara: I’m sorry, Dean. I can’t help you.

Off the Brothers’ crestfallen look (well, actually, Dean looks pissed), we cut to a grotty door inside a grotty appartment. Jack awkwardly busts through it while Castiel stands behind him in the hallway (I guess it’s practice?). The two of them infodump that this is Brother Rudy’s apartment, that Pastor Joe was probably lying when he said they parted on good terms, and that Brother Rudy was good with electronics (while glancing over at a desktop computer that has been turned off). So, he’s their prime suspect.

At least, until they walk into the bedroom, and find him handcuffed to the bed and very, very dead. He’s been rotting for weeks, so who’s been sending the messages? Oh, and who painted the word “LUST” above the bed?

Outside Pavel’s, we get a look through the window at Amara, still at her table, receiving a folder (either another menu or the bill) from a waitress. Inside the Impala, Sam is saying philosophically “Well, maybe it’s for the better” (“best,” Sam. You use a superlative, not a comparative) while Dean is starting the car. He’s surprised when Dean turns the car off. Dean says he still has a question for Amara and goes back inside the diner.

Amara is surprised to see him (um … isn’t she practically omniscient?) and at first misinterprets his one-word question – “Why?” – to be another attempt to get her on board the Get Chuck train. But Dean actually wants to know why she brought his mother back. Was it some kind of lesson? If so, he’s confused about what that lesson was. He fills her in that it ended badly and that his mother is now, once again and for good, dead.

Dean [angrily]: So, what is it, exactly, that you wanted to show me? What was the point?!

Amara: I wanted two things for you, Dean. I wanted you to see that your mother was just a person, that the myth you held onto for so long of a better life, a life where she lived, was just that – a myth. I wanted you to see that the real, complicated Mary was better than your childhood dream because she was real, that Now is always better than Then, that you could finally start to accept your life.

Dean [calmer]: And the second thing?

Amara: I thought having her back would release you, put that fire out – your anger – but I guess we both know I failed at that.

Dean leans forward and says with great intensity, “You’re damned right.” Leaning back with a look of contempt, he adds, “Look at you, just another cosmic dick, rigging the game. You’re just like your brother.”

Amara tries to explain that it was “a gift,” not a “trial” or a lesson or a manipulation. Dean replies that he’s “not angry, Amara. I’m furious.” What infuriates him is that his life has not been his own and neither have been his choices. He’s been “a hamster in a wheel, stuck in a story,” and her brother is responsible. Worse, he’s not the only one. All of them, even Amara herself, have been dancing to Chuck’s tune. He calls out Amara’s conviction that somehow, deep down, Chuck loves her back: “Now who’s stuck in a dream world?”

Shaken by his fury, and the hard truths he’s serving up (albeit with some furtive glances around to avoid freaking out the rest of the diner), Amara asks, “Can I trust you?” Dean replies, fiercely and with great conviction, “I would never hurt you.”

Amara finally agrees to “think about” helping them.

Outside the soup kitchen (oh, sigh, this storyline is so dull), Sylvia is on the stoop, freaking out. Princess comes out to sit down beside her, so absorbed by her phone that she doesn’t notice Sylvia’s distress (Sylvia is crying for real, this time). Pastor Joe, Princess says, is “freaking out” about the vid of Valerie getting her fingers chopped off.

When Sylvia asks (with great interest) if her father called the police, Princess says that “the FBI guys” (Castiel and Jack) persuaded him not. But Princess ignored this injunction and posted about it online (“So many frowny faces”). Princess is so self-centered and attention-seeking that when she asks rhetorically, “Can you believe it?” she doesn’t notice Sylvia’s demeanor change.

Sylvia looks at her and pulls a big old kitchen knife out of nowhere. “I believe,” she says as she grabs Princess by the neck and stabs her in the abdomen. “You never did!” The shot closes on her look of fanatical determination as Princess screams in agony offscreen.

Cut to Pastor Joe telling a terrified Princess she’s going to be okay (yeah, not so much), since the ambulance is coming. The guy he was comforting earlier is holding her head (feet up, Show. Learn some damned first aid in that writers room). But when she says her attacker was Sylvia and that Sylvia is in the “storage room,” the pastor immediately ditches her to go running after Sylvia. Okay.

Castiel comes in through the gathering crowd and tells the other guy that he’s “got this” (he subsequently heals Princess offscreen). He sends Jack after Pastor Joe, who is busting into the storage room to find Valerie tied up. Yep, that’s right – Valerie was in the same building as everyone else (I found this twist a bit daft).

When the pastor goes to help Valerie, Sylvia grabs him from behind and puts the knife to his throat. Her beef with Daddy is two-fold. First, she says that he failed their mother (even though he points out that her mother was such a fanatic that she refused to get any medical attention and kept putting her trust in God instead of science). Second, she accuses him of creating a charismatic ministry of people who now put their faith in him, not God. Which is sort of true, but, ironically, probably a lot better than praying to Chuck, anyway.

Jack distracts her by coming in. She shoves her father aside and confronts him. When Jack says he just wants to help her, she says dismissively, “Everyone’s trying to help me.” She mocks his attempts to make his “fathers” happy, then stabs him. Obviously, that doesn’t go as planned as he doubles over, but then straightens up as the wound glows and heals.

Sylvia’s shocked, but that doesn’t stop her from attacking Castiel when he enters the store room. Castiel easily disarms her and, as Pastor Joe shouts at him not to hurt her, puts her to sleep. He then comes over to Valerie’s chair. After sending Jack to call the cops, he rips the unconscious Valerie’s bonds off and, right in front of Pastor Joe, heals her chopped off fingers. She wakes up and pulls her hand out of the Saw contraption, looking at it in wonder. Pastor Joe, in awe, asks, “What are you?”

The next day, Pastor Joe is still digesting that Castiel is an angel (“Not a very good one,” Castiel admits). As Sylvia is led past them to a police car, clutching a crucifix (yeah, that’s sure gonna do her good now), Pastor Joe wonders what will happen to his daughter. He’s still under the illusion that he has a say in it.

Castiel and Jack kindly don’t state the obvious (that she’ll probably spend the rest of her life in prison), but just in case this scene weren’t already loaded with enough overt irony, we see the cop about to drive her away is the CRD Zach from earlier in the episode. So, Pastor Joe’s stated mission of now concentrating on his daughter’s spiritual and mental welfare is likely to be in vain. She’s hellbound one way or another.

On the way home that night in a nice, but beat-up, old pickup, Castiel is driving and Jack is riding shotgun. Castiel tries to tell Jack that he saw how he stalled out at giving “testimony” back at the church and guesses what the problem is. He says that Jack doesn’t have to “shoulder your burden alone.”

Jack admits that he does. There’s something he didn’t tell TFW about Billie’s plan. He’s not just going to “kill God.” His journey is to become a bomb that kills both Chuck and Amara, and he “won’t survive.” Needless to say, Castiel is most distressed by this news, especially when Jack begs him not to tell Sam and Dean: “They wouldn’t understand.” Jack is convinced that his self-sacrifice is the only way that the Brothers will forgive him for what he did to Mary. Castiel refuses to make that promise and to go along with this plan, but Jack tells him gently, “It’s not your choice.”

Cut to the Bunker, where Dean, in his MoL bathrobe, is hunting down a half-full bottle of “Johnny Labinsky’s Kentucky Whiskey” in the Library and having a swig. He turns around as Castiel enters the Library. As they exchange intel on their respective cases, Dean asks where Jack is. Castiel says he’s in his room. They got in late and didn’t want to wake up anyone.

When Dean allows that he wasn’t asleep, anyway (that chronic insomnia), Castiel admits he’s off on another mission because the plan they have in place to get rid of Chuck isn’t a good one. When Dean asks why, we get Pensive!Cas and the screen goes dark.

Credits

Ratings for this new episode dipped slightly from those for the previous episode to 0.3 in the A18-49 demo (though they were 0.4 for A25-54 and 0.2 for A18-25) and 1.070 million.

Review: While, admittedly, I was greatly distracted by all the Election drama (I apologize), I stalled out on this one for a while because the hunt story with Castiel and Jack was so damned boring and derivative that I just couldn’t. The stuff between Dean and Amara was fine, but it took them forever to get there. And yes, there was some nice gore. But poor Matt Cohen really got stuck with a dog of a script from Davy Perez.

Let’s talk for a moment about the pastor’s daughter, Sylvia. While this storyline was a ripoff of Saw and Seven (never been a fan of either franchise and this isn’t even the show’s first go-round on the Seven Deadly Sins), it was also yet another Evangelical Christians Gone Homicidal plot. I think the show just went one too many times to that well. This plot felt really stale.

The whole Evangelicals Gone Homicidal thing is borderline-cliched about mental illness. The trope doesn’t really mean that the villain is mentally ill, though (when we call them “nuts”), as that they are irrational, self-centered and completely lacking in empathy.

I felt no sympathy whatsoever for this girl. Sylvia was a near-serial killer (not for lack of trying), judgmental of the sad, broken people who came to the soup kitchen, fanatical without having the least clue what Christianity or spirituality was really about, and just an all-round brat. And it was also a little too clear that she enjoyed, even savored, the suffering of her victims.

She even murdered/assaulted people she knew and supposedly cared about (like her gay ex, Connor) because they had disappointed her in some way. It didn’t really help that the script waited until nearly the end of the second act to give her some depth, but I don’t know that she would have come off as sympathetic even if the writers had begun sooner. She was a monster with a smiling, human face, as the show had Castiel and Jack pretty unsubtly bang home to each other after she was unmasked.

No, the people who came into the soup kitchen weren’t perfect, and Connor and Valerie definitely did some dumb things that (nearly, for Valerie) got them killed, but that was kind of the whole point of the ministry. I appreciate that her father felt guilty for not giving her enough hugs or whatever, but I suspect Sylvia was a lost cause for a long time. Her dead mother sounded quite scary if this was the influence she had on her daughter. There isn’t really a whole lot of difference between Sylvia and the fanatical parishioners in Season 5’s “99 Problems.” I didn’t care that she was Hellbound. She definitely deserved it.

There was also, alas, zero attempt to tie in Sylvia’s fanatical devotion to a fantasy Sky Daddy who was better than her real daddy with the cold, hard fact that the real God, in this episode, is currently mopping up universes and getting ready to destroy this one, too. With five episodes left, I think the show should have tried harder to tie the MOTW into the mytharc. Kind of a shame they wasted a good Rolling Stones song title on it, too (though there wasn’t any decent rock music in it, anyway).

So, yeah, that happened, albeit it mostly happened for the purpose of setting up Jack’s confession at the end of the episode to Castiel about the other half of Billie’s plan. I have to say I was more pleased that the show was finally acknowledging that a Jack Saves The Day – But For Realz This Time plot wasn’t going to work, than surprised that 1. there was an actual twist and 2. this was what it was. They sure telegraphed it, but hey, at least they remembered that they needed some twists before the end. I was getting bored.

I feel that the show really wants me to feel sad and distressed about Jack’s imminent sacrifice – and upset and mad at Dean for being so callous – but frankly, I don’t. Jack’s not wrong that at this point, he’s probably going to have to go out in a blaze of glory for TFW in order for Dean to forgive him and you know what? That’s on Jack. Jack has burned so many bridges with his “family” at this point, has so consistently chosen power over them, that he really does need to do something big in the time this show has left in order to prove that he’s not going to do it again.

I don’t just mean that Jack’s guilt (now that he has it again) is holding him back. Unlike on Lucifer, where everyone who does something meriting going to Hell actually feels some kind of latent guilt about it (even Cain isn’t allowed to be mortal again until he does), on Supernatural, you go to Hell for actions. You can even go to Hell if you don’t deserve it, if you make a deal (however selfless) with a CRD or are even just in the wrong place and the wrong time (Eileen and Kevin).

What I mean is that Jack can’t be part of the family until he feels an actual emotional connection to TFW, loyalty rather than guilt, real affection rather than emotional neediness, and a willingness to learn from his mistakes. Wanting to sacrifice himself for them is a start, I guess, but it feels a bit lazy. In a way, it’s easier to kill himself and leave behind the pieces he broke without having to clean them up. In order to be part of TFW, of that family, Jack has to build the relationship on his end. He has to work at it. No one else can do it for him.

I find Dean’s response the most natural and in-character of the remaining main characters. Castiel is clearly still brainwashed (Jack brainwashed both him and his own mother from the womb). And I don’t buy that Sam has actually forgiven Jack. In fact, I strongly suspect that Sam is doing his usual shtick of acting all calm and reasonable, and pretending he’s forgiven Jack, while having very little to do with him beyond shallow interactions. He did exactly the same thing with Mary. Perhaps it’s so important to Sam that Dean forgive Jack because he can’t do it, himself.

Now, I do think at some point, Dean should probably forgive Jack, but that’s Dean’s journey, not Jack’s. Unless we’re really coming out and saying that Dean is the literal Jesus Christ figure in the show (which makes Sylvia’s clutching a crucifix at the end triply ironic), Dean’s forgiveness of Jack would not give Jack true absolution. Only Jack truly repenting of his ways and actively choosing to change them would do that.

I was glad to see Amara reunite with Dean. I was rather less glad by how little we got of it, how long into the episode we had to wait for it to arrive, and that Dean was setting Amara up. I do sort of get that Dean is willing to betray Amara because he is upset with her due to how things went down with Mary, that he blames her somewhat for that. I don’t like it at all, but I kind of get it.

These two scenes in the diner demonstrated both how deep this show can get and how shallow and mechanical. So, it’s up in the air which one we will get in the past two episodes. In the first part, we get a speech from Amara in which she monologues about the cosmic nature of her relationship with her brother, in a way that, at the very best, flirts heavily with a retcon of Season 11. It’s redolent of self-indulgent, 1970s-comics metaphysics and the writers’ apparent conviction that the MCU movies were philosophically deep. Now, I’m not slamming the MCU movies. They worked emotionally for a lot of people with good reason. But My Dinner with Andre they’re not.

The second scene is a whole other ballgame. Dean is upset because he believes that Amara was just toying with him by giving him back his mother. But Amara makes it clear (and she’s a straight shooter, so this is likely honesty on her part) that she meant it as a gift.

She then mirrors back to him his own lifelong philosophy that reality is always better than fantasy, no matter how harsh the reality and how nice the fantasy. That philosophy has saved his life (and the universe) on more than one occasion (most openly in Season 2’s “What Is and What Could Never Be,” which is pretty implicitly referenced in this conversation). But she does so in a way that, far from his usual bitter assessment, this can be a way to move on to a better and happier life, rather than being stuck in a rut. That’s actually a pretty darned good life lesson.

It’s therefore extra significant that the two of them make it clear to each other that they would not ever hurt each other and so far, a few episodes down the road, that’s proven true. I so wish that Dean could just replace Chuck and run off with Amara at the end of this show, but I have a feeling Amara’s not going to make it to episode 15.20. The writers have tied her too tightly to her brother. Ah, well.

Next week: Drag Me Away (From You): The Brothers are called in by an old friend to deal with a case they thought they’d put to bed decades ago. This is the last weeChesters episode.

The Kripke Years

Season 1

Season 2

Season 3

Season 4

Season 5

The Gamble Years

Season 6 (with Kripke)

Season 7

The Carver Years

Season 8

Season 9

Season 10

Season 11

The Dabb Years

Season 12

Season 13

Season 14

Season 15

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23 thoughts on “The Official Supernatural: “Gimme Shelter” (15.15) Recap and Review”

  1. Since it looks like ‘Inherit the Earth’ is being discussed, I’ve noticed that the IMDB user reviews are very negative. But fans elsewhere, as well as most professional critics, seem to like it.

    I thought the episode was okay for the most part. To be honest, I can’t think of an alternative way to conclude the arc, other than for Chuck to just have a change of heart.

    Not to beat a dead horse, but I wish they had never made Chuck to be God in the first place. It made the villain overly powerful. I would have preferred a Cthulhu-type entity, or some other cosmic being, to have been the final opponent.

    One thing I did like a lot in the last episode was the montage of characters and highlights at the end. It was neat to see Dean and Sam when they were younger, as well as to see Crowley again. Was their dad shown? I may have missed him.

    I really wonder what #20 is going to be? Could Cas possibly be brought back? Or will the cast and staff just shoot the breeze or something?

    1. A few things: First, if you liked the episode, that’s not a problem. Praise away. Opinions are always fine, here, as long as they are expressed within the basic guidelines of being polite to each other.

      Second, “professional” blogger reviews are always going to be more positive than fan reviews, especially early on. Most media bloggers these days are superfans who managed to get an inside connection on their favorite show(s). In order to keep that connection, they essentially have to promote the show with each article and review.

      I ran across a great article a while back (unfortunately, I don’t know how to find it right now) by two guys who had worked their way up the media review food chain to getting invites to media parties. They talked about how they gradually began to lose access and they theorized it was because the showrunners and studio execs they were dealing with began to realize that when they said they were doing honest reviews, they really meant that and that some of their reviews would actually be critical when they didn’t like something.

      Showrunners and other execs aren’t going to grant you access if they think you’re going to reduce the value of their product, even if honest reviews often have the opposite effect. The only time they’ll reverse position is when they see an opportunity to cash in on the negativity–the audience backlash toward the Game of Thrones finale, for example. Or if they are trying to bury an actor, producer or project, for some reason (Clayne Crawford on Lethal Weapon, for example, who got used as a scapegoat for the show’s highly dysfunctional bts drama until his co-star helpfully showed what an ass he was by quitting the project in the middle of a season).

      So, when you look at reviews and want to get an overall idea of how the audience felt about an episode (and often, even the online fandom isn’t actually in agreement on that because we’re not a monolithic entity), you want to look at reviews by people who don’t have a vested interest in blowing smoke up the show’s TPTB’s asses. A lot of fans on social media who are reporting as they watch the show, for example, want to get as many hits and attention from TPTB as possible, so they post spoilers and they blow lots of smoke and superlatives. Bloggers, obviously, want to protect their access. But people writing reviews on IMdB (I can tell you from personal experience) aren’t getting paid to write negative ones, so they have no dog in this fight.

      Now, it’s true that polls can be gamed (the bronlies and the destielers are currently having a fight about it over on Spoiler TV), but it’s probably not a coincidence that the Spoiler TV poll being questioned was so overwhelmingly negative. More importantly is the difference in quality between the media blogger reviews and the IMdB reviews. The media bloggers are extremely vague about what they liked about the episode in terms of mechanics. It’s all feelings and how the episode was emotionally satisfying and such nonsense. The negative IMdB reviews are real specific about what they didn’t like and they have a lot of criticisms of the script, specifically. We’ll see how things fall out later on.

      I definitely agree with you that Chuck should never have been made God in the first place. It was a stupid idea. It’s still a stupid idea and they really struggled with it these past few seasons.

      How I feel about montages tends to be colored by how I feel about the episode surrounding them (also, the high water mark is definitely “Tell Me” in the Miami Vice series finale. Difficult to top that one). For example, the montage in “Swan Song” is actually quite moving, but I just can’t get beyond how much I hate that episode with the passion of fifty thousand exploding supernovae. I kind of feel the same way about this one, though I was intrigued when someone pointed out that the song choice was likely not accidental. “Running on Empty,” indeed.

      If they’re smart next week, they will deal with the Empty Entity. It’s far more powerful than Jack and could likely eat him in one gulp. And it’s still awake and mighty pissed off. So, you may get your Mythos ending, after all, Kirk.

      1. Not to spoil but in the promo for the series finale that they showed this week – Sam and Dean are in a barn? approaching 4 individuals that look odd. Not angelic or demonic. It looks like they are wearing masks and not the Covid kind. Somewhat white or metallic? Is this the behind the curtain behind the curtain that we finally get to see? I wont say aliens but – aliens? (Watchers? Observers?) No that’s too weird. Dabb wouldnt go there, would he? I’m kind of kidding but I just cant imagine what is up with that scene. What makes me nervous is that Dabb is the master of ripping of (sorry, repurposing) others storylines and I could see him doing something that stupid. What is up with that shot? Are they still hunting? Is this where they meet their end?

  2. Eagle Eyes Aly strikes again.
    What a scandalous waste of good beer!
    They used FBBC beer pumps / and logos in Dean’s imaginary bar last season too didn’t they?

    1. Not to spoil but in the promo for the series finale that they showed this week – Sam and Dean are in a barn? approaching 4 individuals that look odd. Not angelic or demonic. It looks like they are wearing masks and not the Covid kind. Somewhat white or metallic? Is this the behind the curtain behind the curtain that we finally get to see? I wont say aliens but – aliens? (Watchers? Observers?) No that’s too weird. Dabb wouldnt go there, would he? I’m kind of kidding but I just cant imagine what is up with that scene. What makes me nervous is that Dabb is the master of ripping of (sorry, repurposing) others storylines and I could see him doing something that stupid. What is up with that shot? Are they still hunting? Is this where they meet their end?

    2. Yes, they did and the episode where the kids steal the Impala with all the cursed objects in it. The bar where the proprietor knows Dean and Sam as the Campbells. I think that was the last name Dean used. One if the signs on the wall was for FBBC. And the beer Dean was drinking at his childhood friends bar was FBBC. Lots of plugs for a beer we can only get in Texas….

      1. The sadly unobtainable FBBC beer and too far for an easy beer run to Texas for me.
        Yes they are known as the Campbell Brothers in Lebanon ( Jack’s known as Bambi…)

        Also, apologies, seem to be glitching, my posts are doubling up, no idea why

        1. They had to switch to a distribution model during the shutdown, so you don’t actually have to visit the brewery to taste some of the beer. Unfortunately, it seems that Texas laws currently make it impossible for them to sell beer online to customers outside the state.

            1. I’m a little fuzzy on why Texas does it, but they are generally related either to alcohol being considered not too safe to transport via USPS or state blue laws. They’re not the only brewery I’ve seen who can’t deliver by mail, unfortunately.

  3. I was thinking evil thoughts when Cas said there were too many cats. No Cas , there are never too many cats, pictures, or real. So there!

    Yeah, the A story was flat, trying to figure if it was actually the acting, writing or both, probably both. The sole person I connected with in that part of the episode was the dirty old lady (who by the way is a fabulous character actor who knows her stuff and owned her scene) the rest were standard CW unpleasant and unlikable. Somehow the Cass/ Jack combo never seems to land either, again probably the writing.

    I actually didn’t enjoy the fact Amara thinks it’s her place to “Fix” Dean , she didn’t have the right to interfere. I wish people would stop correcting Dean (Sam &Cass) he’s not an idiot . Telling Dean how to grieve ( shape shifter councilor) there’s no right way, only your way. Or Amara destroying Dean’s only good memory of his mother in pursuit of making him be something else “fixing” him.
    Why can’t people let him be? I’d argue Dean was more stable and balanced in season 1 than he is now, in part it’s obviously because of so much trauma, but also it’s because people alway expect him to fit an unrealistic ideal he can’t achieve.
    That’s not to say he’s a well man, over the years Dean’s mental well-being has got worse and he should address it, but let him pick his own path to that mental wellness, don’t impose things on him. There’s no one perfect fit to achieving that but Dean ought to have say in how he tackles his recovery.

    At the end of the day, Amara did do more harm than good because Dean was re-traumatized by losing his Mom again a second time and with all the attendant fall out and tension it caused, Dean became isolated and outside of his own family. Not helpful really.
    I’m also wondering if the resentment of the intrusion, his prior experience of being compelled against his will to be attracted to Amara played into Deans drive to be rid of Amara too, his whole truck with the celestials had always been they push him around and disregard his feelings and wishes. It’s been heightened this season with Chuck so maybe he is just so done regardless of the guilt, he wants them all gone and it’s blunting his compassion ? Every man has his breaking point, even a good man can do bad things when pushed too far.

    Sam being pro Amara was odd, but I think that was just his way of being distanced from what may need to happen, by making it Dean’s responsibility. Or maybe he was just a fanboy because she’s a Celestial? Sam used to fanboy Chuck too at one point. There didn’t seem to be a logic , if Sam was worried Dean was going of the rails and losing his compassion, why didn’t he discuss his fears more? Check in more about how Dean was handling this instead of the vague shuffling of feet.

  4. I’ll have something more substantial to say later. In the meantime…

    Why does the show use only fake brands of alcohol? Were they reluctant to snag a little product placement cash?

    1. In this last episode where the Winchesters entered the empty restaurant. There was a tap left open as a result of Chucks rapture to the cornfield which Dean turned off. The beer that was running freely was Jensens FBBC Ghost ale. 🙂

      1. I did not notice that.

        And it was a whole level of cruelty for Chuck to ‘rapture’ Miracle like that.

        I liked Adam up until he betrayed them because….he f-ing killed Lucifer again!!!!

        Did Jack soak up Lucifer and then Michael’s archangel power? Glad he brought Amara over but don’t like her just being ‘in there’ and not her own person.

        I went back to the beginning, when Chuck and Amara first got together: I think Chuck was not USED to another being as powerful as himself and he was jealous of Amara. And so they split. I thought they had UNITY at the end of All Along the Watchtower; and then they split up and then they reunited but it made no sense to me AT ALL that she would give up all agency like that.

        I liked Dean, I’m not MAD I’m FURIOUS.

        1. Yes, really bad that the Amara, the single female powerful celestial was subsumed into her brother.
          Not exactly pro girl power!
          Miracles very existence brought more joy to Dean than he’s had all season, Miracle gave Dean back his fighting spirit, allowed him to have a small measure of hope.
          Jack’s a crucible for the excess god powers, but he’s not yet god.
          Sam accepted his part in the mess which was not that well written, dialogue a bit clunky, but nice to see.
          Chuck proved Dean’s point all along, they were hamsters in the wheel, but they still proved they were better then him, standing up to him with dignity even though they had no chance and no guarantee the plan would work . The Winchesters surpassed Chuck as superior by not taking retribution when they could and showing clemency instead.

          1. I think it was not clemency they showed to Chuck: it was the ultimate FUCK YOU. Just like Castiel did not kill Metatron back when Cas found him shooting ‘outlaw videos’ because Metatron could not stand the humiliation of being ‘human’ I think the Winchesters left Chuck to stew in his own insignificance.

            NOT clemency. Dean’s Act of Revenge. Really petty and TOTALLY appropriate.

              1. Kind of makes you wonder how safe the SPNverse really is with Jack. Not only is he simply a black hole for the divine, rather than a truly wise entity, but he’s dumb as a post and has now demonstrated how a very smart and unscrupulous power broker could seize the godhood from him. If he even still exists as a person after the end of 15.19 (which looks doubtful), I don’t see him holding onto that power for very long.

      2. Eagle Eyes Aly strikes again.
        What a scandalous waste of good beer!
        They used FBBC beer pumps / and logos in Dean’s imaginary bar last season too didn’t they?

        1. It’s in Austin in the Hill Country. Dripping Springs. I’d love to visit sometime. They have a website you should check out. It looks really nice.

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