The Official Supernatural: “Bloodlines” (9.20) Retro Recap and Review

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According to recent reports from Vancouver, the cast returned to work the first week of August (about two weeks late). Jensen Ackles also explained in a recent virtual “fan experience” through Creation Con that the writing for the last two episodes has been tweaked to reflect recent events (i.e., the Coronavirus pandemic). With these writers, I’m not sure if that’s a good thing or a bad thing. He also said that 15.19 will be a season finale, while 15.20 is more like a series finale (and expressed sadness on Instagram when he got the final script, which said “The End” instead of the usual “To Be Continued”). In an already truncated final season, that likely means we’ll get stuck with some filler clips episode as the last one. Yay.

The show is returning October 8 and the series finale will be November 19. Yes, it’s back on Thursdays. I should be able to bring in the newest season 15 recap and review the following Thursday.

There are some new trailers out for the last episodes. Finally.

If you’re enjoying these articles and reviews, any contributions are welcome. Even in a pandemic, the kitties still gotta eat and I’ve got a house full of fosters right now. My kitty Goose is doing much better, thank you (she’s acting as if nothing happened now), but I’ve still got that bill, so every little bit helps.

Scroll down to find links to all of my recaps and reviews of all seasons up to this point.

Recap: No recap.

We start in Chicago, IL (no, literally, that’s where they filmed this episode) in a square that’s lit up like a crown jewel. A young, well-dressed African American couple are entering a tony restaurant called Il Secundo with jazzy music on the soundtrack (“Somehow” by the group Caught a Ghost). Inside, couples are sitting and chatting. The woman of the couple (her name is Tamara, but I never heard it once in this episode) talks about what a nice restaurant and calls her date “Ross.” Should I be concerned for her welfare that he doesn’t name-drop her right off, too?

Anyhoo, he’s acting a bit shady (in an “I’m about to propose to you in some particularly embarrassing fashion” way) and quickly leaves the table when he sees someone across the room. This turns out to be the maitre d’, but when Ross goes up to him to ask him to put an engagement ring in his date’s wine, the maitre d’ quickly ditches him when two white guys – one in a suit and one clearly a bodyguard – come in and goes to hang out with them. Ross is quite startled and calls him out on it. The bodyguard says something nasty, but Ross is too thrown by the monstrous reflection he sees of the bodyguard in a mirror to respond and lets it go.

The maitre d’ takes the two white guys down a hallway to a vault door with an electronic lock. It opens onto another, secret bar (if they’re keeping it a secret, why bother to have mirrors in the main restaurant that show the bodyguard’s a monster to any human patron? That’s dumb). There are a lot of jump-cuts in this scene that are intended to be jazzy and just come off as annoying.

Inside, the guy in the suit greets a young, blonde woman and exchanges air kisses. She says she liked him “better as a blonde” and walks away. So, the guy changes his appearance. He walks past one woman with cat-like eyes and a young vampire at a table, feeding on his willing date, and so on. He ends up at the bar, where the blonde woman is working, and asks her if she likes him better this way.

A dark-haired guy named Julian, who identifies himself as a werewolf when he says he’d loved to “eat Taylor Swift’s heart,” comes up behind him and tries to roust him from the bar. They trade insults that explicitly identify each other as a shapeshifter and a werewolf (you know, in case we the audience were too slow to catch that) and then blows. Julian ends up walking away, but claiming he will be back, or something.

Then someone with metal claws cuts a transformer somewhere in the building and the lights go out. The blonde flicks a snake tongue, tasting the air (for the attacker? I dunno). Then said attacker comes in and starts slaughtering everyone in the dark.

Cut to Ross … Ennis … whatever the hell his name is (Tamara is calling him Ennis now) on the steps outside. She’s confused that he wanted to leave so abruptly. He just says the restaurant wasn’t their scene (making the whole monster thing a very, very clumsy racial metaphor on the level of EVOL Racist Killer Monster Truck in season one’s “Route 666”), so he takes her over to a ferry stop. He starts talking about how they met in grade school on the ferry. She can tell he’s gearing up to ask her to marry him and starts to smile.

Then the shapeshifter dude from the bar comes staggering out, holding his bloody entrails. He collapses at Ennis’ feet as Ennis yells at his date to call 911. The shapeshifter keeps saying “David … I’m sorry … I didn’t have any choice.”

At that moment, the guy with the metal claws grabs Ennis’ date for some random reason (I guess because he sees her on the phone and assumes she’s calling 911) and slams her into a corrugated metal door. She slides down it, dead. Yes, that’s right – this is a show where even guest characters take a licking and keep on ticking, but not this girl. She’s got the fortitude of a hummingbird, poor thing, plus a fatal case of girlfriend fridging.

The guy with the metal claws throws Ennis around a bit for no reason (by which I mean that he doesn’t bother to kill him, too, which makes no sense), then grabs the shapeshifter and stabs him in the heart just to make sure. Then he runs off. Ennis runs to his girlfriend and weeps over her dead body. I check the time. 37 minutes to go. Yikes.

Cue title cards.

Cut to North Chicago University. A gray-haired professor gets called out by, I guess, his grad student, who is filing something (in this day and age? Really?) and thought he was off on a weekend trip with his wife. He makes some excuses and goes into “his” office.

Once inside, he shuts off his phone buzzing with a call (why do people never mute their phones when they are obviously sneaking around on shows?). Then he goes to the computer. Plugging in a thumb drive, he sits on the desk and answers the call – after changing into a much-younger man with none of the bloody shedding you would expect from a shapeshifter, just like the one in the teaser (major retcon fail here). It turns out he is stealing the professor’s math test in order to sell it to other students. Yay.

Outside, he’s coming down the steps when he gets a call from a woman named Margo who is apparently his sister and calls him David. Oh, I see. This is David.

She says that their brother, “Sal,” has died. The audio on this call is very awkwardly edited, with the actor playing David almost talking over the “sister’s” lines in response before they’re even said.

Cut to a police station where Ennis is answering questions from an asshole detective because reasons, I guess. Ennis gets mad at the guy basically calling him a liar (instead of, you know, just taking his statement like a professional). The detective apparently thinks this is okay because he had some kind of beef with Ennis’ father, who had been a police officer and is supposedly dead. Wow, this whole scene has not aged well, has it?

The detective claims to be Ennis’ friend and to have looked after him since his father, who was a mentor to said detective, died. Ennis insists that he saw what he saw and what he saw was a faceless monster with claws.

Two FBI agents walk in on the “interview,” showing their badges and saying they’re going to talk to Ennis. They are, of course, Sam and Dean, so when the detective protests the intrusion, nobody in this audience is liable to care what he thinks.

Dean [showing the detective the door]: Listen, uh, Detective, your, uh, perp fits a certain profile. Now, I could go into detail, but I’m not going to.

Dean slaps the guy on the shoulder, walks back into the room with an eye-roll, and closes the door in his face. Thank God for Dean.

Sam leans forward and gets right down to business asking Ennis about last night. Ennis petulantly asks if they’re going to call him “crazy,” too. (He has a tendency to chew all scenery in sight, plus a disconcerting way of overenunciating, perhaps because the actor, Lucien Leon Laviscount, is British and struggling with his American accent in this episode.)

Dean: Try us.

As Dean walks forward, the scene dissolves to Ennis telling them about what happened. He insists that what he saw was a monster (while brushing aside Sam’s commiseration over the death of his girlfriend). Dean tells him, “I don’t know what to tell ya, kid, but there’s no such thing as monsters.” Sam looks conflicted as Dean says this, but he still gets up and follows him out.

Cut to the detective meeting with Margo. She’s a nasty blonde in a severe black pantsuit with some serious bling half-covering her deep decolletage. She is asking him about whether or not the “ghouls” are ready to ally with them.

The detective says that with her father incapacitated and her brother Sam dead, the other families “have concerns.” She tells him to tell the ghouls and the djinn and whoever that she’s the one in charge now. They’re interrupted by David coming down the stairs. Margo is surprised David came home and the detective tenders his not-very-sincere condolences to David for their brother’s loss (seems Sal was Doomed Teaser Shifter).

When David asks what happened, Margo blames it on Julian, the werewolf from Il Secundo, claiming that he must have come back after his dust-up with Sal and killed everyone just to get to Sal. She says he carved Sal’s heart out, then stalks off.

David goes after her into a room where two men in leather jackets (like the bodyguard in the teaser, who ended up with his throat cut during the attack at the bar) are making up a small arsenal. She smiles nastily when she overhears the detective asking David to “talk some sense into her, because I sure can’t.”

When David, in a loud and rather condescending tone, asks her what she’s doing, she says that the family is “going to war.” She tells him that if he has a problem with it, he can talk to their father.

Daddy Dearest is upstairs, in bed, in a coma. Margo comments from the doorway that David has been away three years when David marvels uneasily at how much worse their father looks than the last time they saw each other.

Right outside the room, on the landing (is … that the same interior set as last week? Or is it Bobby’s old second story set?), brother and sister proceed to have a pretty loud fight about whether or not the werewolves were really responsible for their brother’s death. As it turns out, Margo (who claims to have a witness to the attack – she probably means Ennis by way of his detective “friend”) doesn’t really care because she sees this as a chance to get out from under the thumb of the werewolf family. Well, alrighty-then.

She leaves her brother with a parting shot – his ex, a werewolf named Violet, is about to get married, as part of a merger with a New York werewolf clan. She tells him that he “got out” because he wanted to be human and always “had a soft spot for them.” So, maybe he should stay out.

I am struck by how hard the show tried to cast actors who look like brother and sister, while completely forgetting that they’re shapeshifters and could look any way they like. They could even resemble actors with talent.

Inside an ornate Italianate pile, Julian is talking to an older djinn about whether or not the shapeshifter family will make a move. The djinn warns him not to understimate Margo. The aforementioned Violet comes in, saying she needs to have a conversation with him. When he tries to brush her off with that “man talk” nonsense that was dated even when Sean Connery was doing it in the 1960s, she insists.

They go out into the hallway. I see this episode is going to have a lot of should-be-private conversations out in the hallway where lots of people can hear. Also, where the hell are all the servants? The last staff we saw was that blonde at the bar.

Violet gets straight to the point and brings up Sal’s murder. Julian, to her surprise (but not ours), already knows. She asks why he’s talking to the djinn and he says he needs muscle against Margo because she assumes he killed Sal and he’s not interested in letting her think differently. Besides, the shapeshifters have been “chipping away at our territory” and acting insolent for years. When she begs to differ, he shoves her up against a wall and threatens her. She gets all weepy.

I will discuss this a good bit further in the review, but I just want to pause here to note that I really hate the misogynistic WB/CW trope of the forceful Alpha Male who is abusive, but is there to make all the teenage fangirls cream over a bad boy. It is precisely why I didn’t watch either The Vampire Diaries or The Originals for very long. This destructive, mean-spirited trope needed to be retired about twenty years ago. Ain’t no Spikes in this lot.

Cut to Ennis getting off a subway (with The Black Keys’ “Little Black Submarines” on the soundtrack), still in his suit from the night before. Apparently, his girlfriend didn’t have any family or friends or even a boss, because nobody is trying to contact him about her death. Also, he apparently has no job to go to because nothing ever gets mentioned.

He enters a house that appears to belong to him. It’s an older house but in decent shape. He opens a closet and then a trunk and then he takes out a photo of … his dad in police uniform. Well, I did not see that coming. I expected him to be moping over photos of his girlfriend.

So, then, he gets down further to what he was really looking for (past a lockpick of some type), which was his dad’s revolver, but he’s surprised to find, in a hidden compartment in the case, silver bullets. With crosses etched on them.

Cut to the crime scene, which Ennis is watching from a balcony above, now dressed in some kind of green hipster’s jacket and hoodie. We get a black-and-white recap of his girlfriend’s ridiculous fridging because I guess the writers assumed we weren’t paying attention during the teaser. But hey, at least he finally remembered her.

He turns back from the balcony and uses the lockpick to gain access to the club. He finds his way into the restaurant with a flashlight and then somehow into the monster speakeasy he previously didn’t know anything about (big old plothole there). It’s dark and everything is smashed up. It’s also not locked the way it previously was. One table has a big slash on it. There’s also a big pool of blood.

Suddenly, the lights go on and he acts surprised by this totally foreseeable event. As he ducks down behind the bar, gun drawn, the maitre d’ comes in, wheeling a bucket. The maitre d’ somehow sniffs him out. Rattled when the maitre d’ leans across the bar, Ennis jumps up and yells that he’s a cop. The maitre d’, showing vampire teeth, says, “I don’t think so.” He grabs him as Ennis shoots him several times to no effect.

Good thing there’s someone there with a machete to whack off the guy’s head from behind. That would be Dean, with Sam beside him, gun out. Cue a Bill-and-Ted-style rock guitar riff.

Dean [to Sam]: I think he looks better with a little off the top. [to Ennis] If you wanna run, now’s the time.

Ennis, shocked but full of bravado, insists on staying. So, Dean tells Sam they “should give him The Talk.” So, Sam does.

Sam: My name is Sam Winchester. That’s my brother Dean. We kill vampires. And werewolves and demons and … basically, we chase down evil and we cut its head off.

Ennis jumps right on this and calls them “monster cops” (Dean corrects him with “Hunters”) and then gets straight to the point: What killed his girlfriend?

Dean says they’re working on figuring that out. It might be a new MOTW or it could be “Freddy Krueger.” Ennis then asks about the bodyguard he saw reflected with a monster face in the mirror. Sam says it was probably a Wraith and that monsters can look human except in reflected surfaces or sometimes cameras. Ennis asks if beheading works for all monsters and Sam hedges, saying silver bullets sometimes work, too. Oh, Ennis, you have no idea.

Dean, meanwhile, is looking through the cupboards over the bar for some reason. He finds a blood bag and bags of meat, one of them a heart labeled “Susan.” The casual way Dean says it is about the only time Jensen Ackles is ever able to inject some Mark of Cain weirdness into any of this episode. And he had to work hard at it.

The Brothers come to the conclusion that Sal wasn’t human (though they’re puzzled by the monster gang war aspect) and decide to check out the body. Ennis insists on coming with them, even though that’s a really stupid thing to do. He goes off on a rant about his life is already ruined.

Sam tries to talk him down, saying they have a lot in common (boy, do they ever – like the exact same fridged girlfriend motive), but warns Ennis that being a Hunter is “messed up.” Ennis, being not the brightest bulb in the chandelier, won’t listen. The Brothers leave and the camera focuses briefly on Ennis’ face twitching.

Cut to an overhead Chicago subway (the L?) and then inside Ennis’ house, where he is finally looking at a picture of his poor girlfriend. He’s also doing some belated research on Sal (on the family’s company website) and fingering a silver bullet.

There’s a knock on the door. Let me guess – Asshole Detective? Yep. Got ‘er in one. He wants to talk more about the “thing” Ennis saw the night before. Ennis points out that AD’s previous theory was that it was a human being, some “gangbanger.” AD pretty much invites himself in (and what’s with these camera angles where a character practically walks into the camera before stopping or there’s a dissolve?).

AD keeps asking questions Ennis already answered the night before (and misses an obvious reference to Ennis’ deceased dad coming home from work later on), so Ennis checks him out on his camera phone and sees mirror eyes. He lures AD into the bedroom where he finds his gun.

Tossing a jacket at him to distract him, he points the gun at him and yells that it has a silver bullet in it and he’s not “Freddie Costa” (AD now has a name). The camera passes behind Ennis and when it comes back out, AD has changed into David Lassiter (half a head taller, but in the same suit which, somehow, still fits). David starts begging for his life, basically, by giving up his name and saying he’s a shapeshifter. Ennis is confused.

David: I’m a shapeshifter.

Ennis: You’re a what?!

David: We shift our shape. It’s kinda all there in the name.

David admits that he’s trying to find out who killed his brother. He faked being the detective because, well, that’s his main talent. Poor David then gets saddled with some ugly infodump as he fills poor, clueless Ennis in on what’s really going on in Chicago (because, when he says, “out there,” he obviously isn’t talking about Abaddon or Metatron, or any of the larger mytharc, of which he has no idea, himself).

He says the city is run by five families, has been for a while, and they’re all monsters. The werewolves run the Gold Coast, the djinn the South Side and … well … you get the picture. Despite owning the police and all being rich and powerful One Percenters (and having criminal counterparts on both American coasts), the monster families keep a low profile and their victims to a minimum because reasons. If they go to war, humans and monsters would die. So, kinda like every other part of the country, then.

While talking, David picks up Ennis’ coat and notes that the slashes from his girlfriend’s killer have silver in them. Julian, being a werewolf, can’t abide silver and even David admits that it’s burning his hands. So, Julian couldn’t be the killer. He then tosses the coat at Ennis, who somehow doesn’t fire his gun while startled and falls back into the closet. By the time he gets back up and rushes outside, he can’t see David (probably because David is hiding in plain sight as a shapeshifter).

Annoyed, Ennis comes back into his room and sits down at his computer. Clicking out of the page about Sal Lassiter, he starts searching for Julian Duval. Later that night, he goes sneaking around Julian’s castle and spots Sam and Dean infodumping in the street to each other about Julian, while sitting on the Impala.

We see Violet come out the door while a guard stands outside. She calls out the guard as David in disguise (she’s right). He’s surprised she noticed. She’s like, You’re not that clever, dude.

She asks where the real guard is. David says he’s locked in a closet. He says his brother’s dead. She says she knows and she’s sorry, but her brother didn’t do that. David says he knows that, but she has to talk to her brother and get him to stand down. She’s like, yeah, right, like anyone will listen to him. David’s “just a runaway and I’m just a bitch” (’cause she’s a werewolf, a female dog, geddit?). David asks what happened to her and why she didn’t meet him at the station at midnight, as they’d originally planned some years ago. She looks down, ashamed. He’s all whiny and full of manpain, while crying.

Fortunately, this irritating scene full of mounting cliches is interrupted by the claws dude from the teaser. He unexpectedly jumps from the balcony and knocks David down. David tells Violet to run (she’s already beating feet) as his attacker slashes at him. Um … she’s a werewolf. Why doesn’t she just transform and go after the guy? Surely, she and David together could take him on.

Claws Guy jumps up to go after her and David jumps up to go after him. Predictably, David gets knocked down again and is about to lose his heart (with silver claws slowly going into his chest), when a shot from Ennis startles Sam and Dean, and drives off the attacker. As David gets up, we hear a scream from Violet and David goes running after her and Claws Guy.

Sam and Dean then show up right after Ennis in the clearing. An alarm rings somewhere and Dean says the most sensible thing in the episode when he points out it is time to bail.

Out on the street (or a street, since I’m pretty sure they all drove off together at high speed), the Brothers, Ennis and David get out to rehash the show’s basic premise that we already heard a scene or two before. Poor Dean gets stuck with the infodumping this time. He calls it “Godfather with fangs.” I’ll bet that was Andrew Dabb’s pitch, too.

As thunder rumbles and it starts to rain, David gets off his cell phone, saying Violet won’t/can’t pick up hers (well, duh, she just got kidnapped). He has to admit that Violet is a werewolf, causing Dean and Ennis to say, sarcastically and in unison, “Awesome.”

Ennis points out that they can trace Violet’s phone if it’s still on (you know, something the Brothers do all the time). Sam allows that’s a good idea, but David doesn’t want to give up the number because he wants to come with them. Even though the Brothers could probably take the phone away from him, Dean just shrugs at Ennis’ objections (which are rather lame, anyway) that David is a shapeshifter and says that “sometimes, you gotta work with the bad guys to get to the worse guys” (Ennis, honey, you have no idea). When David acts offended, Dean says he couldn’t care less (the audience couldn’t care less, either – shut up and get in the car, David).

Somewhere in a generic warehouse, Violet’s phone is buzzing in her coat nearby as she slowly wakes to discover she’s chained (probably iron or silver) to some kind of pillar. Woefully and rather briefly, she tries to break free (that’s not happening), then looks over at an illuminated bulletin board full of photos of a cute baby.

Claw Guy is right beside her in a nearby convenient shadow. He starts talking, saying he’s not a “freak” or a “monster” like her. He pulls back his hood and pulls off a balaclava. He’s wearing dark glasses (infrared goggles?), which he also pulls off, stating that he’s “just a man … with some fun little toys.” He also has a Freddy Krueger-style glove tipped with silver razors. Violet looks constipated.

Later that night, the Impala pulls up next to a building with what look like Dorian columns. So, I guess she’s actually in the cellar of a museum, or something. David belatedly tries to apologize and commiserate over Ennis’ loss (across the top of the Impala, no less). Ennis brushes it off at first, but then, when David whines that he “lost someone, too,” commiserates enough with David to tell him that his brother’s last words were: “David, I’m sorry. I didn’t have a choice.” Nothing is said about how Violet is about to get fridged, too, just like Ennis’ poor girlfriend who has no family or friends asking about her death.

Dean mercifully breaks up this mangst fest by telling them that they can “kiss and make up later. We got work to do.” Yes, Dabb actually puts that into the script. They all go inside.

Inside, Violet is getting kinda tortured by Claw Guy. He proceeds to infodump that his young son was murdered by a monster (at least, he believes it was that and not the animal attack it was chalked up to be by law enforcement). He now blames all monsters.

Violet tries to point out that her brother and Sal “hated each other” and wouldn’t kill children, anyway. He doesn’t care because 1. she’s a monster, too, and 2. she’ll be dead by morning, anyway. She’ll be found “in pieces” all over town and it will start a monster war. When Violet points out that innocent human babies will be killed, too, he looks uncertain for a moment. But then he hears a noise upstairs. Putting his goggles back on, he leaves her there.

Inside some steam tunnels, Dean pauses to break the gang up into two teams. He’ll go with David and Ennis with Sam. Dean calls David “Romeo” and David snarks back, calling him “Buffy.” It’s not too bright, all things considered, but David doesn’t have what you’d call a whole lot of common sense.

Case in point, when Dean goes in with his pistol and flashlight, David (who’s wielding a shotgun), doesn’t keep up with him for some reason. So, when he spots Claw Guy’s shadow, he heads after him alone. Predictably, he gets ambushed, captured, and chained up next to Violet. Good going, there, David. Dean, backtracking, finds he’s disappeared.

Claw Guy comes in, having beaten David, and starts threatening the two of them, prompting each to try to protect the other. I might have cared if David weren’t so annoying and I hadn’t met Violet a grand total of two scenes before her ending up in this predicament. It doesn’t help that she’s got all the personality of a drenched Cocker Spaniel. I’ll admit that’s not fair to Spaniels, who are quite lively dogs with a lot of personality and energy, but it’s the image I keep getting whenever she’s onscreen.

When Claw Guy starts torturing David by sticking his claws inside his chest again (how is that not immediately fatal?), Violet finally loses her shit, wolfs out, busts her chains, and attacks Claw Guy. Her slow-motion flying leap is hilariously bad. I remember laughing even the first time I saw this.

She slashes him up good and is about to eat his heart out (literally) when David manages to bust his ropes and drag her off the guy. Because reasons, I guess. They hug as Claw Guy slowly gets up, his face all slashed.

Sam, Dean and Ennis arrive at that moment on a platform above them. Dean asks, “What’d we miss?” in a rather warning tone (not much, Dean, not much). Claw Guy looks up at Ennis, recognizes him and apologizes for killing his girlfriend, as Sam and Dean exchange looks. Then he backtracks, saying “she was in the way” and that David and Violet are “monsters.”

Ennis shoots him, anyway, saying “I only see one monster here.” Even Ennis looks a little shocked, afterward, by what he’s done.

The next day, David and Violet are taking a walk on a path near her family’s McMansion. He tells her about Sal’s last words and wonders out loud why his brother was sorry. He says Sal never did anything to him, so what was he sorry about and why did he have no choice?

As Violet looks shady as hell, she has a flashback to the night she didn’t meet David at the bus station. Well … she was on her way when she had an encounter with Sal. Sal tells her that mixing the bloodlines is bad and that if she runs off with David, there will be a war and a lot of people (well, monsters) will die. So, we’ve got an interracial persecuted couple metaphor for two rich white characters, when the show actually has/had two characters of color in a relationship? That’s … embarrassing, CW.

Sal then threatens her life if she leaves with David. As he leaves, she tells him that she loves David. He says, “I wish that mattered.” Welp, any reason left for me to care about Sal biting it in the teaser had now evaporated.

In the present, an oblivious David is still eulogizing his brother when he asks her what Sal meant. She lies and says she has no idea, really. As she turns to leave, David gets pissy and basically calls her a coward. She turns back briefly to kiss him passionately, enough to draw blood with her fangs. Then she leaves. David looks confused as she goes. Well, dude, you did get an answer, but maybe she needed to draw you a map, or something.

Back in his mansion, David is by his father’s bedside when Daddy Dearest wakes up. Daddy whispers the obvious, that David’s sister “wants war,” and then tells David he has to stop her.

Later, David lays Claw Guy’s glove on the table in front of Margo, as two henchmen watch. David says Sal’s killer was just a “messed-up guy.”

Unimpressed, she still wants war, but David then drops another bombshell. He’s coming back to the family. As the two henchmen exchange a smug glance, Margo realizes they’d rather follow him and OhmyGodcouldthisspinoffbeanymoresexist? Margo’s pissed. Even though I don’t care a hoot about her, I can’t blame her. I’d be pissed, too. Besides, where’s that monster families war this episode teased for forty minutes?

Margo musters a fake smile and says, “I’ve waited a long time to hear you say that.” But as David exchanges bro-hugs with the two henchmen and the detective (who has appeared out of nowhere), and Margo moves in for her own hug, we see her smile drop as soon as he can’t see her face.

The Impala pulls up to Ennis’ house. Sam asks, “You live here alone?” in a disbelieving tone. Sam, come on. You and your brother live in a ginormous bunker underground. The house ain’t that big.

We finally get a little more info on Ennis. He says that his sister lives on the other side of Chicago. His mother is “out of the picture” and his father died.

Meanwhile, Dean is getting an urgent call. It’s from Castiel who has a lead on Metatron. When Sam protests that Chicago is full of monsters to hunt, Dean points out they have bigger fish to fry. Sam turns to Ennis and rather weakly tells him they’ll be in touch and insists they will send him some other Hunters to help. Sam gets kinda emotional unsuccessfully trying to talk Ennis out of getting into Hunting.

Ennis tells him he’ll be fine. Of course he won’t be. He’s like a babe in the Hunter woods. But never have I been so relieved to see the Brothers ride out of town and an episode, ’cause that means this one is about to end.

As they leave, Ennis watches them from the street (hey, at least Dabb didn’t try to give him his own Impala). Then we get a voiceover over a montage as he says he couldn’t just let things go. He has to follow that rabbit hole.

Loading up his dad’s gun, he goes back down to Claw Guy’s lair and then he checks out the death of Claw Guy’s son (the fact that Claw Guy’s story puts paid to the whole idea that the monster families are discrete about their activities and choices in victims is never, ever brought up, not even in his scenes with Violet and David). He fingers his fiancee’s ring.

As he does so, he gets a call. It’s from an Unknown Caller who tells him, “What are you doing? If you start hunting, the monsters will kill you!” As the caller hangs up, Ennis says, “Dad?” in astonishment. Guess Dad didn’t die a long time ago, after all.

Credits

Ratings rose a bit to 1.0/3 in the A18-49 demo and dipped a bit in audience to 2.03 million. You’d have thought that would have been enough to greenlight the show (The Originals only got a 0.8/3 and 1.77 million as the lead-in for that night), but Bloodlines never went to series. I’m guessing that’s because the critics’ reviews were mainly polite, but lukewarm, while fan ratings (such as on IMdB) were generally scathing.

Review: This episode made me miss Metatron. I was so bored at times that I kept ditching on the recap to go read snarky reviews about it, instead. They were much more fun. Rewatching it wasn’t as bad as I’d dreaded it would be, but that doesn’t mean it was a wonderful experience, either.

“Bloodlines” is a stupid episode and it would have been a terrible series. As one of the reviewers said at the time it came out, they’d really rather see a series about those two older Hunters who kept coming in and saving Ennis from his own stupidity. What were their names? Oh, yeah – Sam and Dean Winchester. The only time the episode is remotely interesting is when they’re onscreen. Unfortunately, they’re not onscreen very much.

Also, if you were wondering how the Brothers were reacting to last week’s events involving the Mark of Cain, that doesn’t get mentioned at all in “Bloodlines.” It exists kinda in its own universe. I liked the idea someone suggested (at the time) that this was really an alternate universe Sam and Dean wandered into (or this was an alternate Sam and Dean) because that means this universe just got smote by Chuck. Though I do feel bad for that version of Sam and Dean.

Partly due to this being filmed on location in Chicago, which probably seemed like a good idea at the time, there’s a glossiness to the cinematography in this one that might have worked with a better script (Andrew Dabb, probably working from a corporate checklist), better direction (Robert Singer, directing on autopilot), better acting from the guest cast, better title … I dunno. But here, it only highlights how bad those things are. Yes, even the title.

Not a single one of the guest characters (who would have been the main characters in the spinoff) lands. Not one. Ennis is an idiot and overreacts to everything, plus he later shoots a human being without an ounce of remorse. I get that the guy killed his girlfriend, but that is a serious line to cross, killing a human. I mean, it’s one that the man Ennis killed crossed, so why is it okay for Ennis to blow right over that one as if it’s not there? What’s to root for in that?

The monster family premise is flat-out stupid and none of the monster characters is remotely sympathetic. David is set up as a sympathetic monster, but the show completely undermines him right off the bat by introducing him as a slacker who has no problem stealing tests and selling them to the highest bidder. You could argue that Nathaniel Buzolic as David is somewhat more engaging than Ennis. But much of that has to do with his getting snarkier lines as the Cute White Male Lead and Laviscount being saddled with a boring and humorless Angry Black Guy stereotype.

David does not improve on further acquaintance and has zero buddy chemistry with Ennis. However you feel about the Supernatural pilot, it set up its premise quickly and efficiently with no fuss or muss – and the chemistry between Sam and Dean was undeniable from the outset. There’s none of that here between Ennis and David, and certainly none between David and Violet. Without that, there’s little reason to keep watching this as a series.

I get that Sam and Dean are grifters, but they are also doing that because they are poor and live hand-to-mouth. David does it because he’s a privileged twit and he’s bored. Hardly the same thing and I recall being very dismayed that Andrew Dabb (yes, the showrunner currently running the show into the ground) thought that it was. It looks as though Ennis and David are supposed to be the Sam and Dean analogues of the show, but neither of them seems capable of finding a moral compass with both hands.

Every single one of the other characters is a snarling, one-dimensional, unpleasant mobster cliché (except the shady detective cliché and the dippy soap opera star-crossed girlfriend cliché). Their menace and power are completely undercut by the fact that Dean talked Death out of wiping their city off the map four seasons earlier and neither of them so much as mentioned these monster families.

There is no mention, either, of the season six storyline in which almost all of the remaining Alphas (with the exception of the Vampire Alpha, who made it all the way to season 12), who basically functioned for the monsters like the pagan gods with humans, were killed off. Nothing about Eve.

These five families seem blissfully unaware of anything that looks like a larger cosmic conflict than their petty urban turf wars. The stakes in this proposed spin-off are depressingly low. It’s as if the pilot for Game of Thrones had introduced the White Walkers very briefly in the teaser and then simply ignored that existential threat for the rest of the show in favor of the One Percenter shenanigans in King’s Landing.

These monsters are spoiled, sheltered, posturing nobodies who think they’re somebody and have no idea that however they act, they are all Purgatory-bound. Why would I want to watch a show about them? Yeah, it’s also a big plothole that Sam and Dean have never heard of these families, and are willing to leave Ennis to take care of them. But at the same time, the Brothers’ cosmic dance card is pretty full and the monster families of Chicago are not anywhere near the top of their list in important things to resolve (as the call Dean gets in the coda makes clear).

And what’s really bizarre? These bozos have never heard of Sam and Dean. We had an entire freakin’ low-life family of vampires last week who had heard of Sam and Dean. Sam and Dean are famous in the monster world. So, why haven’t the high-and-mighty monsters of Chicago ever heard of them?

A big problem here is that, as in “Bitten,” the episode heavily focuses on guest stars who are not actually the center of the episode’s story. It’s still about Sam and Dean on a hunt. It’s just from the perspective of the episode’s side characters.

This could be a brilliant premise and way to look at Sam and Dean (and hunting monsters) from a different angle. The problem is that the writers never seem to understand that that’s what they’re doing. They always act as though the story is really about the side character, when the central conflict actually still remains firmly with Sam and Dean.

This is probably the main reason why all the monster family politics comes off as boring and irrelevant. All that soap opera might have ended up being important if this pilot had ever gone to series, but it had no bearing on the story in the episode itself. All it did was function as a giant, convoluted red herring to hide the lame “twist” that the MOTW was just a messed-up human Hunter, who was promptly dispatched by other human Hunters, with no necessary involvement by the monsters themselves besides playing Damsels in Distress. So, of course the audience felt bored and cheated by what was going on. The monster families had no reason to be there. A lot of screentime was wasted on characters with no purpose in the episode itself.

It doesn’t help that other retcons shift the episode loose from the mothership’s worldbuilding moorings. The idea that shapeshifters can now just change in a flash without having to shed their skin in a bloody and painful transformation may seem minor, but it quickly turns the entire concept ridiculous in a way the original version never was. The bloody transformation idea showed that shapeshifters could grow or shed mass within a certain limit. The show didn’t have to say what that limit was, since it was made reasonably clear from those transformations without any unnecessary dialogue infodump. It also grounded the talent shapeshifters had in a gritty, painful reality the audience could buy into (and that’s probably why the show went back to it after this).

The way shapeshifters change in this show cuts loose from all that bloody, concrete reality and that one retcon creates a cascade of ridiculous and unfortunate implications. For example, when David shifts shape from the detective to himself, his suit doesn’t change, even though he’s taller. His tie is still at the same level with his belt. He looks a lot like his sister, when there is no reason for them to look alike, especially after three years (and why do all of these monsters have to be white?).

And there is no apparent expenditure of effort or tradeoff in the shifting. It turns the concept from one of the better MOTWs in the show into something cheap and stupid. These characters never appear to be monsters, just young and pretty actors wearing weird prosthetics.

Andrew Dabb was definitely not the writer to pull this one off. He actually gave an interview to TV Guide right before the episode came out, where he claimed this spinoff would fix Supernatural‘s “woman problem.”

It is highly debatable whether Supernatural has any worse of a woman problem than any other show on TV, let alone the CW (no bastion of feminism, no matter how much its leadership may delude themselves on that score). But I will say that fixing whatever this problem may be is not ever going to entail fridging a girlfriend in the teaser, a hot minute after we meet her (did we even get her name onscreen before she died?), let alone having one of the (only) two regular female characters be a bitchy, castrating blonde and the other a wimpy princess type. I don’t know what the hell kinda feminism Dabb thinks he’s peddling here, but I sure don’t recognize it.

The “diversity,” such as it is, is pathetic. Aside from Ennis and his girlfriend (who doesn’t survive the teaser), there are no major onscreen characters of color. Also, it’s strongly implied that Ennis is working class (i.e., one step above the ‘hood and not very smart or well-educated). Let’s just say that the way all the rich, white monster characters treat him with condescension has not aged any better than whatever the hell The Vampire Diaries was doing with/to Bonnie when it constantly reduced a powerful woman of color from a family of powerful women of color to an isolated handmaid for the white female lead (https://blackgirlnerds.com/vampire-diaries-wronged-bonnie-bennett/). I don’t even want to think about how that would have played out over the course of a series.

Then we’ve got the female characters. Such as they were. Ennis’ girlfriend (whom I frankly found a lot more interesting in her two seconds onscreen than Ennis in the entire episode) died in the teaser. I cringed hard that she was the one who barely made it through a few minutes of screentime, while the men in the story spent the entire fourth act rescuing the pure white monster girl (Melissa Roxburgh, struggling to channel Lillian Gish, though she did better as Lila Taylor in season seven’s “Time After Time”). What the hell kind of diversity is that, Dabb?

Margo barely appeared beyond the first act and was mainly there to be bitchy. It was never sufficiently explained why it was so bad for her to be acting Head of her family or even why shapeshifters would have a fixed gender, let alone patriarchal gender roles. With that little anti-trans poison note (which also has not aged well in 2020), it’s no real surprise “Bloodlines” had no discernible GLBT characters. Considering this was the season where Crowley and Dean began their version of Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance,” that is a major oversight.

Then there’s Violet, bless her heart. The girl has the personality of a wet blanket. She seems to exist solely to give Dabb an excuse to call female characters “bitch” a whole lot and to show a female character being regularly abused as part of the plot. The really sad thing is that this is a character who is a werewolf, which means she has superstrength and other superpowers. So, why the hell is this girl so weak? How could the show make a female werewolf a damsel in distress, especially after last week’s vampire matriarch?

It’s pathetic that we arrived in 2014 with a backdoor pilot that claimed to celebrate diversity but couldn’t even even achieve gender parity. There should have been a female detective to match the male detective. Ennis’ girlfriend shouldn’t have died, bringing in another human character (who would also be a woman of color). There should have been more female side characters than just that one bartender. Somebody should have had another sister to balance out Sal. Hell, why are the only two women isolated in two different families so that we can be guaranteed never to have even a hint of a Bechdel Test because they aren’t even likely to interact with each other, let alone while talking about anything but one of their obnoxious male relatives?

The thing is that the title of the episode (and what would have been the series) is an unfortunate dead giveaway of which sources Dabb was ripping off. Bloodlines was an offshoot of the Vampire: The Masquerade (1991) rpg game back in the 90s with a similar premise, also the TV show Kindred: The Embraced (1996), which came out (briefly) around the same time (there’s even a major vampire character named Julian in the series). It’s also quite obvious that the writers were trying to do some kind of mashup of Supernatural with The Originals, with the latter heavily favored in influence.

I’m still fairly baffled by just how much the CW execs have hated and failed to understand Supernatural as a show (and I don’t just mean the Dawn Ostroff period). Sure, The Vampire Diaries was very popular for its first few seasons, but as a water cooler show, it faded hard after about season five and I don’t see much evidence that it’s found an afterlife (sorry) of great note in syndication or streaming.

The Originals, which got paired with Supernatural, dropped early and pretty consistently rated below Supernatural during season nine. Without being propped up by the CW (obviously as a way to continue the popularity of the mothership show), I doubt it would have seen much more than a season, so I’m confused why the CW would want this kind of mashup when the romanticized vampire trend was already on the way out.

I still fail to see why they greenlit Legacies over Wayward Sisters. I’m guessing it had something to do with the Wayward Sisters deal falling apart behind the scenes and the CW still having some kind of deal with Julie Plec. Legacies felt very slapped-together-at-the-last-minute (what is even going on with the creepy relationship between Super White Mary Sue and her Giles-like mentor? I mean, I loved Giles on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, but come on, that was two decades ago), whereas this piece of dreck was crafted with loving and misguided care.

I said “writers” because it was fairly obvious that Dabb didn’t come up with this idea all by himself. I imagine a room full of straight, white, male CW and WB executives (living in a privileged bubble in Hollywood) getting themselves all hot over this idea. Convincing themselves that it was such a great way of freshening up the Supernatural franchise and bringing in a newer, younger, hipper, more woke audience (which just goes to show they were completely blind to The Vampire Diaries‘ and The Originals‘ own vast problems with misogyny and problematic treatment of people of color). I think they made a classic mistake here in trying to do that while utterly failing to hook the show’s already-established audience. I’d think the whole point of doing a spin-off was to keep and build on as much of that established audience as possible. I guess not.

Rewatching this, I realized that the network, even after Dawn Ostroff left, has really just been doing retreads of old WB subplots (star-crossed lovers who are star-crossed because they’re wimpy morons, sympathetic monsters, abusive Alpha Males, Evil Older Characters who do things that are perfectly okay for younger characters to do, creepy older British mentors for teenaged girls with superpowers, that sort of thing). There’s even a reference in the episode to Buffy: The Vampire Slayer, with no sense of what made that show unique.

But Buffy was a long time ago. Rich, privileged white girls who are the Chosen One are no longer innovative TV. And there aren’t any Buffy-like female characters in this spin-off, anyway.

Anyhoo, this one and the events within it were dropped like a hot rock after “Bloodlines” aired and wasn’t picked up. So, I think we can now chalk it up to just another of Chuck’s failed drafts.

Next week: King of the Damned: Sam and Dean are torn between helping Castiel with his rebellion and following a hot new lead on Abaddon.

The Kripke Years

Season 1

Season 2

Season 3

Season 4

Season 5

The Gamble Years

Season 6 (with Kripke)

Season 7

The Carver Years

Season 8

Season 9

Season 10

Season 11

The Dabb Years

Season 12

Season 13

Season 14

Season 15


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