Tag Archives: Sharp Teeth

Retro Recap and Review: Supernatural 9.12: Sharp Teeth


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It’s been a tough summer, so I’m way behind on my recaps and reviews. As of this review, I now have 52 episodes left to finish for previous seasons, plus the 20 for the final (15th) season that starts on October 10. That’s 72 total by next April. I currently have 144 coffees at $3 each on Ko-Fi. If I get 300 coffees total, I will commit to doing one recap/review per week (retro or Season 15). If I get 400 coffees, I will commit to two. If I get 500 coffees, three reviews. If I get 600 coffees, four reviews. If I get 700 coffees, five reviews per week.

Other that that, any and all contributions are welcome! You can still find my reviews here of North Carolina ghost story books, and notes about my folklore research on Patreon.

My collected recaps and reviews of season one, which first appeared on Innsmouth Free Press, are up (with a few extras) on Kindle. The Kindle version is available through Amazon. The print version is also up. If you buy the print version, you get a Kindle copy thrown in for free. I also get paid if you get it on Kindle Unlimited (for free), read the Kindle version, or lend it to a friend via the Kindle Owners Lending Library. Reviews also help with sales. Just FYI.

Scroll down past this review to find links to all of my recaps and reviews of all seasons up to this point.


[spoilers ahoy for several seasons]


Tagline: Garth comes back (stop groaning out there in the Peanut Gallery) and he has a Big Secret that could tear the Brothers apart. Oh, whatever could it be?

Recap: Recap of why Sam is mad at Dean about Kevin’s death and then of the last episode, where Dean got the Mark of Cain. We also get a quick recap of Garth and his greatest hits (which mostly remind me why I did not miss him at all) and his mysterious disappearance during season eight.

Cut to Now in Grantsburg, WI. It’s dark and there’s an old farmhouse and barn. We hear cows inside the barn making an ungodly noise. The farmer comes running out with his shotgun and chases a man who exits the barn in a hurry. The man runs through the woods behind the barn, the farmer in hot pursuit and firing, and then out into a road where he gets hit by a car. We see the man’s face as he lies unconscious in the road. It’s Garth.

Cue title cards.

Cut to Grantsburg Memorial Hospital. Sam enters in his FBI suit in the afternoon a few days later, asking about a John Doe (Garth, obviously). The receptionist/nurse (I swear Adam Glass has no clue there’s a difference, or that they don’t just let you walk in off the street and interrogate patients) comments that Garth is “popular.” Sam is confused.

He’s less confused when he walks in on someone in denim and plaid civilian clothes, whipping out a syringe in Garth’s room – it’s Dean. They confront each other over Garth’s unconscious body. Dean is still looking rough (though it appears he has showered, albeit still not shaved). Sam is pissy. Dean asks Sam where he’s coming from and Sam says a hunt in New Mexico. Dean allows that’s a mighty long drive, but that he’s got things in hand, so Sam doesn’t need to work this one.

Sam asks if Dean has talked to Garth, yet. Dean admits he hasn’t, since Garth has been drugged up since he got there. Yeah, pain killers aren’t what you put someone with a head injury on, but the medical lunacy gets even worse when Dean pulls out his ginormous syringe of adrenaline (worthy of the late Hunter S. Thompson) and Sam thinks it’s a better (and safer, I kid you not) idea to slap Garth awake. Really.

So, Garth wakes right up (which, again, is not how head injuries or being drugged to your eyeballs works, but I guess Glass has never heard of Narcan), screaming.

By the way, Garth is handcuffed to the bed rail because, according to Dean, he “killed a cow.” Sam did not know this. So much for Mr. Research.

As Sam uncuffs Garth, Dean asks Garth where he’s been the past six months and why he killed a cow. Garth claims he was on a hunt, but when Dean presses for details, Garth suddenly gets ill and rushes into the bathroom. This turns out to be a ruse so he can escape out the window (since when do hospital rooms have windows?).

In the time leading up to their realizing he has left (Sam notices the silence first), the Brothers bring each other up to date. Sam tells Dean about Gadriel’s lingering grace and Dean gives Sam the CliffsNotes about getting the Mark from Cain in order to kill Abaddon – Sam starts to tune out everything else when he hears Dean was working with Crowley.

So, after Garth escapes and they find he stole a car (pretty much naked), and Dean admits he didn’t “test” Garth because Garth was still unconscious, Sam visits the farmer who was shooting at Garth in the teaser. Turns out Garth has already killed a goat and some chickens. He ripped their organs out.

Sam calls Dean, who is holding a photo from the CCTV camera (which clearly shows far too much of a fleeing Garth getting into a car with a clearly marked license plate). Dean claims he got nothing from the CCTV and says that “Garth is a Hunter. If he wants stay gone, he’ll stay gone.”

He then rounds an ambulance and sees Sam on the phone, pissed off that Dean lied to him. Dean says he doesn’t think they should hunt together, that it isn’t safe (it sure wasn’t for Tara). Sam says fine, but they should clear up this situation with Garth first. Reluctantly, Dean agrees.

They track Garth (easily) to a motel nearby and burst in on him. At first, he tries to snow them again, but Dean picks up a bra and asks where “the girl” is. They start going through the motel room and initially come up with nothing. Then a young woman in a sweater and skirt ensemble comes out with werewolf teeth and attacks Sam from the closet just behind him that he did not check. Dean goes to shoot her, but Garth knocks down his arm, yelling at him not to hurt her. Sam, meanwhile, yanks out a silver blade and slashes her with it (she basically manages to slash herself).

Garth then tries to calm everyone down, even as Dean is pointing out that she’s a werewolf, by admitting he is, too. Um, okay.

Afterward, Garth introduces them to her as his girlfriend Bess. Then he introduces Dean and Sam to her in the most condescending and deeply inaccurate terms possible. Ugh. I so did not miss him.

Anyhoo, it turns out that Garth has been missing because he got bitten during a fight with a werewolf in Maine six months ago. He didn’t call the Brothers because he figured he had “messed up” and it was his problem to deal with. He was going to kill himself when Bess found him (she says she smelled him, but it’s never explained how she smelled him all the way from freakin’ Wisconsin) and convinced him not to. Now they’re married and Bess’ pack has accepted him. She is a second-generation werewolf, born to werewolf parents. They don’t eat humans and Garth only eats animal hearts because he is a first-gen werewolf and can’t totally control himself.

At that point, Dean says they need to talk to Garth – without Bess. Garth claims he’s checked out the pack and they’re as advertised. The Brothers can take his word for it. Dean points out that Garth already lied to them once, so “that ship has sailed.” They’re going to need more proof. Garth then suggests that Dean come “pray with us.” Oh, joy. Now we’re going to get Glass’ interpretation of Heartland Christianity.

So, Dean goes to the house, while Sam is off to meet with the town sheriff. As Dean walks up, they’re singing “Bringing in the Sheaves” because of course they are. The woman who greets him at the door calls herself Bess’ step-mother. Her name is Joy. She and Dean have a rather snarky exchange about Dean carrying silver and I don’t trust her syrupy sweet demeanor.

Dean gets introduced around by Garth to his in-laws, including Bess’ dad and Joy’s two redneck nephews Frick and Frack (sorry, Russ and Joba). Dean takes it all in with a grim and guarded expression, ignoring Garth’s attempts to lighten the mood. He does not shake the hand Dad-in-Law Reverend Jim offers to him. When Dad-in-Law suggests Dean eat dinner with them (“break bread with us”), Dean asks in honest confusion, “Why would I do that?”

At dinner, everyone is eating raw meat except for Dean, whose steak is cooked. Dean’s not eating, grossed out by the bloody chowing down around him. When Dean asks whether they’re going to say some kind of grace before eating, Dad-in-Law smarmily informs him they’re “more spiritual than religious” and references “the American Indians” as inspiration for the family’s belief system, “that nature and man are one.” Oh, how culturally exploitative of you, Rev. Maybe that would fly in California, but I don’t think that would go down too well in the Heartland, writers.

Dean then notices that everyone is wearing a silver bullet around their necks and asks why werewolves would do that. Garth tries to correct him that it’s “lycanthropes,” but Dad-in-Law rather sharply tells him that Dean “is entitled to his opinion.” Bess says the bullet is to remind them that their lives could be cut short at any time, that they aren’t immortal or invincible. And yes, it burns.

Dad-in-Law explains that Bess was born a werewolf (he was bitten) and soon after, a Hunter killed his werewolf wife, her mother. He decided not to seek revenge so that he could live to raise Bess. Soon after, he met Joy and Joy is all “Oh, pshaw.” It also turns out that she is a fourth-generation werewolf.

Meanwhile, Sam is interviewing the sheriff, who claims that the Reverend and his family are “clean as a whistle.” Sam subtly asks about “X-Files-y stuff,” but gets nothing on the sheriff’s radar.

Back at the house, Dean is being cornered at the fridge by the two cousins. They act all creepy with Dean, who gets a little feral, himself. Garth breaks it up by coming in and asking to talk to Dean alone. But it seems Garth still does not know how to read a room. He’s there to yell at Dean for being untrusting. Dean points out that Garth is being terribly naive not to look under the surface of what’s going on. Regardless of how it all turns out (and since there’s always a third act twist coming in an MOTW, you just know Dean will be right), Dean has an in-universe point. Hunters regularly check under the societal rug for monsters and usually find some. Garth is being willfully blind.

When Dean rounds on Garth and calls him out for going radio silence while guarding Kevin, Garth gets back on his high horse about how everyone was better off left in the dark … well, until he mentions Kevin and from the look on Dean’s face, he realizes something is terribly wrong. Dean confirms that Kevin is dead and immediately takes the blame, but Garth is shocked to the core. His actions had unforeseen consequences after all.

The Brothers regroup later that night. Sam wants to drink the Kool-Aid, too, and believe in “friendly monsters,” but Dean is still suspicious. Then Sam gets a call from the sheriff to come meet him. They get out there and find a very dead and mangled deer (lots of not-quite-off-stage animal abuse in this one that’s played casually, almost for laughs). As the Brothers check it out, the sheriff grows some claws and dime-store teeth (the kind that make it almost impossible for an actor to talk and emote without looking and sounding like an idiot). He pulls a gun on them, just as Dean realizes the deer is still warm, which means the sheriff killed it himself.

The sheriff appears to have the drop on them, but Dean is hiding a knife behind his back. A silver knife. As soon as the sheriff levels his gun at them, Dean (with amazing reflexes) throws the knife and kills the sheriff with a blade to the heart before he can get off a shot. This makes me kinda wonder why Sam didn’t do his own surreptitious tests on the sheriff during their interview, after calling Dean out (rightly) on not doing them on Garth at the hospital. He is, after all, in a town with werewolves. Everyone’s potentially a monster. That lapse nearly gets him and Dean killed.

Sam searches the body and finds a silver bullet, which Dean mentions is part of Dad-in-Law’s family shtick. Sam then finds the word “Ragnarok” (the pagan Norse end of the world myth, which Dean actually recognizes). Whatever is going on, it’s not nearly as benign as advertised so far.

The Brothers argue over whether to investigate more or just start killing. Dean temporarily agrees to go with the former. He suggests they “grab Garth” and get some answers. He says he’ll go “check out the church.” I’m sure this will end well.

Dean arrives there at night and lets himself in (possibly by picking the lock). As he looks around what seems like a perfectly ordinary church with a flashlight, Sam is picking the lock to Garth’s motel room and finding the place ransacked.

Dean soon finds an odd book containing a flyleaf with early medieval Celtic designs. Inside, it’s a book on Norse mythology (with Celtic designs? Okay) and Dean tags one word at the bottom of a page – Ragnarok.

So, Dean decides to do research on the word right there in the church office (as you do). In an even more brilliant move, Sam calls Dean from the motel room and tells him Garth and Bess are missing. Dean reports on the internet research he did – how the great wolf Fenris kills Odin at the end of Norse days. There are apocalyptic cults that worship the wolf god and call themselves the Maw of Fenris. Sam then says, oh, yay, a cult for werewolves.

Dean has an even more sinister revelation. The cultists in question don’t just see this as mythology, but as “an action plan: human extinction, total and complete werewolf domination” (what the werewolves would eat if humans were extinct is not clear). Not sure how nobody else stumbled across this on the internet when Dean found it just using a word and the idea of werewolves, but okay.

Dean figures it’s time for Reverend Jim to go down with the ship and Sam agrees. Sam asks if Dean needs any help with it. Dean says no. He’s “got this.” He tells Sam to go find Garth and Bess, instead.

Well, in a manner of speaking, Sam gets right on that. As soon as he gets off the phone and comes back out into the hall, he’s cold-cocked by Frick and Frack, the Werewolf Cousins. Ah, Sam. You and your third-act concussions ….

Dad-in-Law arrives at the church unexpectedly. He smells Dean and hears his heartbeat, but Dean still has the drop on him. When the Rev notes that Dean’s heart rate is a little up, Dean coolly says, “Nothing wrong with a little fear.” Not sure that’s really fear, but moving on.

Anyhoo, Dean decides to ask some questions first and shoot later, as it happens. It turns out that Dad-in-Law is aware of the book and the Fenris cult, and that it was once part of his church, but insists he “eradicated it” after he became the pastor. He is therefore willing to let Dean look at his bullet (which, to Dean’s surprise, does not have “Ragnarok” on it), but is shocked to hear that not only did the sheriff try to kill Sam and Dean, but that his bullet did have the word on it. Dad-in-Law is even more shocked to hear that his daughter and son-in-law are missing.

Dean bursts out of the church, trying to call Sam, and roars off in the Impala.

Cut to a barn, where Garth is waking up, chained to a ladder. Bess is chained to the wheel of a nearby wagon. Frick and Frack come in, dragging an unconscious Sam, and chain him to some more farm equipment.

Mother-in-Law comes in and slaps Bess when Bess pleadingly calls her “Mom,” then proceeds to Evil Overlord Monologue. Seems Joy’s little brother got killed by a Hunter last year and she’s tired of her husband preaching peace. As far as she’s concerned, Bess isn’t really her daughter (even though she raised the girl as her own), and she wants to go back to the old ways of trying to rule the world. Because they’ve been so bang-up successful to this point, you know. So, she’s going to … ah … do that by killing Bess and Garth (whom she blames for bringing Hunters to their doorstep, even though it seems that Hunters have been picking at the edges of the cult for decades) and then Sam, framing Sam for the murder. This will inevitably lead to Dad-in-Law freaking out and declaring war on the humans.

Someone pointed out elsewhere that the fact that born werewolves can control themselves, but choose not to, is actually worse than if they don’t have self-control because then it’s a choice to do evil. Joy plays into this by being a total bigot – not just against full humans, but against bitten wolves like Garth and Dad-in-Law and even first-generation born werewolves like Bess. It’s wacky, but sadly, people that bigoted do exist in this world and they are not werewolves.

Dean only tangentially comes up in her rant (her plans for him are pretty vague), which is rather unfortunate for her. Outside, Dean is picking off Frick. Easily.

Dean comes in, gun raised and aimed, just as she’s about to hurt Sam bad for kicking her gun out of her hand and Garth is fruitlessly wolfing out in his own bonds. Joy (busy gloating over how she’s going to stage her own stepdaughter’s murder) doesn’t realize Dean’s there until he’s jumped by Frack, from the hayloft. There’s a brief struggle and then Dean pulls out a silver blade and knifes Frack. Bye, Frack.

She just finished ranting about how her line will die with her (it’s never explained why she never had a child of her own). Yet, Joy doesn’t seem all that broken up over her nephew Frack’s death right in front of her, even after realizing that Frick must be dead, too, because Dean masked his scent by wearing Frick’s coat.

Dean: Oh, I’m full of surprises.
Joy [in a weirdly sultry tone]: As am I!

She goes for her gun and Dean goes for his. As confident as Joy is in her werewolf speed, Dean is faster and shoots her through the heart. With a surprised look, she falls over, stone dead. Thank God. She was really annoying.

The next day, back at the house, as Dean watches from nearby, Sam hugs Garth and tells him to “be good.”

Sam leaves and Garth comes over to talk to Dean. Bess is in the kitchen with her father (so Dean didn’t kill him). Dean says Dad-in-Law is “a good man … considering,” and asks how he’s taking the whole My wife went psycho and tried to kill my daughter deal. Garth says he’ll get over it eventually, but it’s going to take a while.

Garth mopes about deserting Kevin. Dean insists on taking all of the blame for Kevin’s death on himself. Garth doesn’t quite buy that, but sees that arguing with Dean isn’t going to help, so he lets it go.

Garth still wants to redeem himself by hunting with the Brothers. Dean says no. He thinks Garth should retire for good and stay with his new family (note that Sam’s the one who will later drag Garth back into the fight). Dean hugs Garth. Bye, Garth, for several seasons.

The final scene is a daylight Impala scene. Sam gets out and Dean does, too, to talk about the night he left two episodes ago. Dean says his head wasn’t right after Kevin’s death and he’s still not sure what was going on with him, but he’s sorry he took off like that. Sam is still sore (“something’s broken here”), even though Dean apologizes. Dean says he now realizes that it’s better when they hunt together.

Sam agrees, but is still pissed off about the whole Trialberculosis and Gadreel thing. He doesn’t think he can “trust” Dean. Dean says okay, but “we’re family.”

Sam then says that “everything that has ever gone wrong between is because we’re family.” (With the implication that this is all Dean’s fault. Boy, will that come back to bite Sam in the ass next season.) So, they can hunt together or they can be Brothers, but they can’t be both. Those are his terms. Dean looks lost as Sam walks away.

Credits

Review: Woof. Well, this one was a bit of a dog, wasn’t it? If it hadn’t come immediately after “First Born,” and been our first glimpse at the sequel to those events – the first glimpse at Dean’s New World Order, as it were – “Sharp Teeth” would have been completely forgettable. It was quite the letdown from “First Born” and was pretty confusing at the time. Had even a big storyline like the Mark just been dropped like every other dropped plot for Dean? Well, that’s an Adam Glass script for you. Continuity-shmontinuity.

It’s not just the combination of arguably the least successful recurring MOTW on the show (werewolves, ugh) with one of its dodgier recurring characters (who may or may not be a fan favorite, but he sure gets on the nerves of some fans, including Yours Truly), Garth. It’s not the bog-standard silly nonsense about “Ragnarok.” It’s not even that this is the first episode in which we see Sam act like an utter shithead toward his brother in the wake of Dean’s disappearance, or that Sam’s bitchy speech at the end is the most memorable thing about the episode.

No, it’s that it made no sense on first watch because it was impossible to tell where the show was going with where they’d just been. If anything, “Sharp Teeth” has improved a bit on rewatch after knowing how this all turned out. Only now can we see that the hints about something being “off” with Dean and his sudden strength and speed were actual foreshadowing, rather than the usual inconsistent writing for the Brothers in MOTW eps (that dinner scene with the werewolves sure looks different with who’s dangerous and who’s not). But boy, did the episode writing bury that lead.

Now, I get that Sam has a legitimate reason for being angry with Dean – at least on paper. If, say, this were a series where the POV had been a female lead and we saw from her viewpoint how secretive Dean was being with her, how he’d tricked her into letting an angel inside her to heal her, it wouldn’t be that hard to write her as sympathetic. But the show doesn’t write this episode (or this season) from Sam’s POV, not at all. In fact, in the previous episode, we saw what Dean did, from Dean’s POV, and we can’t now unsee that or see it completely the way Sam does.

Even worse, Sam shows zero real interest in what Dean was up to in the two weeks they were separated. They meet by accident over Garth’s bedside. Even after Sam spots the Mark and asks about it, and Dean gives him the CliffsNotes of what happened with Cain, Sam shows no particular interest in following up for more details. Not only is that lousy hunting technique, but it’s also pretty unloving. Even if you leave out the final speech in the coda, Sam is a total asshole toward Dean much of the time.

Sam digs himself in even deeper by whinging the entire episode about how Dean wants to kill Garth because he thinks Garth is a monster and that maybe Dean thought Sam was a monster when he had Gadriel inside him (or should have thought that, because a lot of this “new” brotherly loathing is projection). Never mind that Dean has a chance to kill Dad-in-Law and ends up saving the good guys, in large part, by not doing so.

Even when Dean absolves Garth at the end of the episode of guilt for Kevin’s death, and tells him to go retire and make little werewolf babies with his fiancee, Sam is not willing to let it go. That’s because Sam is actually making Garth’s situation all about himself, which is pretty much what he’s always done when it came to “sympathetic” monsters.

Now again, one could argue that it’s only been two weeks and that Sam is still struggling with the fact that he is now completely human (something he doesn’t really feel like sharing with Dean). But the episode also shows that Sam is more than a little freaked out by Dean’s quick and brutal reflexes (even more than when he came back from Purgatory), and how Dean single-handedly takes out the bad werewolf nest with almost no help from Sam. When Dean kept saying “I’ve got this,” he wasn’t kidding.

Sam does not respond well to that. He demands that Dean be completely tolerant of anything monstrous in Garth (and, by extension, Sam), but won’t give Dean even the smallest bit of such tolerance when Dean does potentially monstrous things that scare him. Sam is afraid of Dean, so it’s “Burn the Witch.” He’s not even willing to bring it out in the open, how he’s freaked out by the (literal) marks of Dean’s recent adventure with Cain the Father of Murder, or that he’s insanely jealous that Dean went on that adventure with Crowley. So, he lets it fester, instead.

This makes Sam something that rhymes with “hypocrite.”

And then there’s Garth. Wow, as if he couldn’t be any more obnoxious. He’s basically an ersatz version of Bobby, right down to co-opting Bobby’s catchphrases. This isn’t necessarily a major problem (though it is a bit disrespectful), but when he tries to talk down to the Brothers, that crosses a line.

The fact that only Dean calls him on it is troubling because Garth doesn’t have even a reasonable fraction of the knowledge and experience Bobby had or, for that matter, what either of the Brothers has. So, his trying to act like a mentor toward them, or mediator for them, particularly when it’s uninvited, starts to become a safety issue after a while. He simply should not be talking down to two experienced Hunters like Sam and Dean (especially Dean because ye gods, man, he’s been in the game for over three decades at this point in the show). They do know better than he does. They are legendary for a reason and it’s not because the show is giving them the plot coupons writers like Adam Glass and Robbie Thompson drop in the laps of their newbie favorites like Garth or Krissy or Charlie.

About the only good thing “Sharp Teeth” does with Garth’s character is force him to come down off his smug cross and use the wood to come to terms with the fact that he is still an amateur. First, his getting bitten is something he admits was his own fault. He got cocky in his “optimistic” worldview and he got bitten. That was when he made his second mistake, which was that he disappeared on the Brothers instead of telling them what happened. Which led to his third mistake, which was bailing on Kevin at a critical moment.

Now, the Brothers are kind about these major blunders and forgive Garth at the end. After all, both of them are floating in a lot of self-imposed guilt, themselves, about Kevin. But while Garth isn’t directly (or even indirectly) responsible for Kevin’s death, his blunders did lead directly to a lot of pain for poor Kevin that could have been avoided and certainly left him less safe in the long run.

The stuff with Garth becoming a werewolf family man, though, is icky. The whole werewolf family thing is a hot mess of new canon that syncs poorly with the old canon. Just consider, for a moment, how this generational purity angle is never followed through when it comes to vampires (who are walking dead), or skinwalkers. And it’s only shakily followed with shapeshifters.

Not helping are Glass’ clumsy attempts to paste an anti-prejudice metaphor over the situation. The idea of monsters as metaphors for gay people or people of color, while it’s been done before and with success, is fraught with problems on Supernatural. Here, it’s more of a metaphor for pedophiles or serial killers and that’s a whole other ballpark.

On the show, all Eve-born monsters (as opposed to angels or demons) and even pagan gods share an important characteristic – they’re predators. There is nothing benign whatsoever about their natural state because in their natural state, they eat human beings. Worse, in their natural state, they feel entitled to prey on humans, whenever they bother to think about the morality of it at all. Therefore, anything humans do to kill these monsters can be construed as self-defense.

Now, sure, some of the monsters, including in this episode, just want to live peaceably alongside humans (so, sort of like humanoid wolves or lions). But ultimately, it’s the humans’ choice whether or not to go along with that because if the monsters “lose control” or actually choose to kill again, it’s humans who will be doing the dying, at least until some Hunters like Sam and Dean show up. Wolves and lions eat other creatures as their primary fare, not humans, and are more sinned against than sinners. That’s really not the case with werewolves, who are literally humans in wolf’s clothing.

The show has always cast Dean as the prejudiced hard-ass who needs to learn a lesson in tolerance, while Sam lays out whatever is the current Hollywood Liberal Straight White Dude line on the subject is, even though Dean actually leans a lot more left in his views than Sam. Dean’s first girlfriend, for example, was biracial, while Sam is quite robustly pro-law enforcement and didn’t give a hoot about the prisoners in lockup during the season two episode “Folsom Prison Blues.”

Curiously, what this has ended up doing is show Dean as the more tolerant one. In many episodes, Dean encounters some new situation that forces him to re-examine his belief system, his values, his prejudices, whereas Sam rarely gets the same shakedown. Instead, you get Sam smugly spouting lessons in tolerance that, in the breach, he doesn’t always follow through on because they’ve never been tested. I don’t think that’s what the episode intended with his speech at the end, but I do think that’s why it sounded like something he would say and do, even as he came off sounding like an intolerant jackass.

I don’t think that Glass really had this subtext in mind, but it’s funny how this blonde, perky, creepy Midwestern clan is engaging in a racist, genocidal religion under the guise of mainstream Protestantism that looks an awful lot like the Nordic nature pseudo-religion the Nazis engaged in under the same cover. Not that I am arguing that modern Nordic paganism is fake or any more inherently racist than any mainstream religion like Christianity, just that there are currently alt-Right Nazi-inspired movements in it that are threatening to take it over and those movements look like the one in this episode.

That may be why the whole “We follow the religion of the American Indians” thing sounds so appropriative and false. Even if Native Americans all had the same religious beliefs (which, of course, they do not), that’s not at all what even the “nice” whitebread werewolves believe in. Dean does make a snarky comment (“Look how that turned out for [the Native Americans]”), but I think that’s in large part because he recognizes how fake the whole thing is. It’s just a cover for genocide.

There was even a last-ditch Nazi resistance plan toward the end of WWII called “Werwolf,” a creature with which Hitler and others in the Nazi leadership identified strongly. Like Garth and Bess and her dad, a lot of Germans ignored the dark cost and concentrated on the bright, shiny, warm and fuzzy of family and fatherland.

Dean gets berated for not trusting Garth’s adopted family of “lycanthropes.” Yet, why should Dean trust even Garth when even Garth lies to Dean and Sam almost nonstop in this episode? While it does turn out that he is basically engaging in wishful thinking of his usual type (taken to a rather frantic extreme), Garth could be brainwashed or even have fully gone over to the monster side for all the Brothers know initially. He wouldn’t be the first Hunter to look too deeply into the abyss.

So, while Sam has a point in theory about trusting Garth long enough to figure out what’s going on, with the way things pan out, this turns out to be a reckless plan indeed. If Dean hadn’t take the Mark just the episode before, the body count among the good guys may have been a lot higher, and it may well have included Sam and Garth and Bess.

Next time: The Purge: The Brothers encounter Sheriff Donna Hanscum, while investigating shenanigans at a weight loss spa. And Sam overshares something with Dean.


The Kripke Years

Season 1

Season 2

Season 3

Season 4

Season 5

The Gamble Years

Season 6 (with Kripke)

Season 7

The Carver Years

Season 8

Season 9

Season 10

Season 11

The Dabb Years

Season 12

Season 13

Season 14


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